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Tills DE-748 - History

Tills DE-748 - History

Tills

(DE-748: dp. 1 450, 1. 306'; b. 36'10"; dr. 13'9"; s. 24 k.; cpl. 22i; a. 3 3", 2 40mm., 10 20mm., 2 dct.,8 dcp., 1 dcp. (hh.), 3 21" tt.; cl. Cannon)

Tills (DE-748) was laid down on 23 June 1943 at San Pedro, Calif., by the Western Steel and Pipe Co.launched on 3 October 1943, sponsored by Miss Helen Irene Tills, the sister of the late Ensign Tills; and commissioned on 8 August 1944, Lt. Comdr. James L. Brooks, USNR, in command.

Tills was assigned to Escort Division (CortDiv) 53 and conducted trials and shakedown off San Diego before post-shakedown availability at Terminal Island. On 16 October, the ship departed the west coast in the screen for Task Group (TG) 19.5, which included escort carriers Makin Island (CVE-93), Lunga Point (CVE94), Salamana (CVE-96), and Bismark Sea (CVE-95). She reached Pearl Harbor on the 23d and took part in antisubmarine operations in Hawaiian waters for the remainder of 1944.

On 2 January 1946, Tills departed Pearl Harbor for exercises with TG 12.3, before the hunter-killer group headed for the Marshalls. Arriving at Eniwetok on 15 January, the destroyer escort remained there a forte night before beginning exercises on the 29th.

Tills weighed anchor on 5 February for a hunterkiller mission. In this, like the other operations staged from the Marshalls, the ship sailed easterly by day and westerly by night to a distance some 400 miles east of Eniwetok. Her patrolling of this stretch of the Pacific between the Hawaiian Islands and the Marshalls continued for 10 days before Tills returned to Pearl Harbor for availability alongside tender Algor (AD-34)

The ship conducted post-availability exercises off Oabu before screening for Sangamon (CVE-26) in late February, while the escort carrier's planes carried out night flight training operations. Returning to Pearl Harbor on 2 March, the ship two days later joined TG 19.3, formed around Kasaun Bay (CVE-69). Two five day training cruises followed, before Till$ was briefly reassigned to TG 19.2, whose nucleus was Tripoli (CVE-64).

After routine training and availability at Pearl Harbor, the destroyer escort embarked 2 Navy officers and 23 Navy and Marine enlisted men for transportation to the Marshalls. On 29 March, she rendezvoused with Gilligan (DE-508) and Whitman (DE-24) which helped her to screen a 17-ship convoy, PD-355T, to Eniwetok. After making port on 6 April Till$ rejoined TG 12.3, which conducted hunter-kilier operations between the Hawaiian Islands and the Marshalls.

Following her 14 April return to Eniwetok, the escort ship remained with TG 12.3, steaming on antisubmarine patrols east of the Marshalls. On 20 April, a typhoon upset the group's routine by grounding Corregidor's aircraft and pitching the small destroyer escorts in the heavy seas and 70-knot winds. The storm finally abated three days later, and the battered task group returned to Eniwetok.

Designated Task Unit (TU) 96.6.7, Tills departed the Marshalls on 30 April and arrived at Ulithi on 3 May. Two days later, the destroyer escort rendezvoused with WOK-9 and screened that convoy to the Ryukyus. En route to Okinawa, Tills sighted an abandoned Japanese patrol boat and sank the vessel with gunfire and depth charges.

Dropping anchor off Hagushi Beach on 10 May, the destroyer escort got underway soon thereafter and relieved Starling (AM-64) on screening duty in the transport area. On the 12th, Tills went to general quarters upon learning that enemy aircraft had been sighted. Spotting two planes emerging from a smoke screen, her gunners opened fire with the 40 millimeter battery before a sharp-eyed lookout noted that the planes were "friendly." The Bofors guns ceased firing immediately, and the aircraft flew away undamaged.

Following her duties with the transport screen off Okinawa, Tills was assigned to the screen of Carrier Division 22 which contained escort carriers Santee (CVE-29), Chenango (CVE-28), and Block Island (CVE-106). As these small carriers steamed toward Sakishima, their planes loaded bombs and prepared to launch. Their target, Sakishima, had been serving as a refueling base for Japanese aircraft shuttling between Kyushu and Formosa and was thus an important link in the chain of airbases which supplied Japan's dreaded kamikaze offensive with its deadly aircraft. Tills served as antisubmarine screen and plane guard for these strikes which commenced on 1 June. The group returned to Kerama Ptetto to rearm and refuel before proceeding northward on 20 June for further strikes.

Four days later, the destroyer escort returned to hunter-killer operations and maintained antisubmarine patrols on a continuous basis until making port at Ulithi for availability alongside Oabu (AR~5). For the remainder of July and into August, Tills continued antisubmarine operations on the sea lanes converging in the Western Caroline basin.

As the war progressed to its conclusion in the Pacific, Tills commenced a needed availability at Guam. While in Apra Harbor, the destroyer escort received word that an atomic bomb had been dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, on 6 August. As Tills entered drydock ABSD-6 three days later for repairs to her sonar dome, a second atomic blast hit Nagasaki. While the destroyer escort was docked, in company with Torrance (AKA-76), Roberts (DE 749), and SS A. McKensie airwaves brought the welcome news that Japan had surrendered on 15 August. The long Pacific war was now over.

After remaining at Apra Harbor until 29 August, the destroyer escort headed for Saipan which she reached later that day. She remained there for almost a month. On 24 September, she was assigned to duty with Transport Squadron 12 at Buckner Bay, Okinawa.

Following her arrival at Nagasaki with transports bringing American occupation forces, Tills made two round trips between Nagasaki and Manila before making port at Saipan on 21 October, ending the initial leg of her homeward-bound voyage. Two days later, in company with three sister ships, the remainder of CortDiv 53. Tills weighed anchor, headed for Hawaii, and reached Pearl Harbor on 31 October.

Tills departed Hawaiian waters on 2 November, bound for the west coast. En route, the ship received word that a large transport plane had crashed into the sea off Oahu, and she was ordered to aid in the search for possible survivors. Of the eight people rescued, Tills picked up two and soon transferred them to Casablanca (CVE-55) where more complete medical treatment was available.

Arriving at San Diego on 9 November, Tilla underwent six days of availability before sailing for Panama on the 17th. Eight days later, on 25 November, she transited the Panama Canal for the first time.

Departing Coco Solo on 27 November, the destroyer escort proceeded to Hampton Roads for further availability in the Norfolk Navy Yard and initial preparations for decommissioning. On 16 January 1946, Tills reported to the St. John's River berthing area to commence initial preservation work for her eventual decommissioning in June 1946.

Reactivated early in 1947 to an "in-service status," the ship was towed to Miami, Fla., where she was partially fitted out. In July, she made a two-week training cruise to San Juan, Puerto Rico, with naval reservists on board. The following month, she entered the Charleston (S.C.) Naval Shipyard for overhaul. Refurbished by November, Tills was homeported at Miami and operated along the east coast from Boston to Panama and in the Caribbean, primarily training reservists.

Till$ was placed back in full commission at Charleston, S.C., on 21 November 1950, with Lt. Elmo R. Zumwalt in command. The destroyer escort subsequently operated off the east coast as a training ship, undertaking refresher and reserve training cruises. Homeported at Charleston, S.C., the ship took part in Exercise "Convex III" from 27 February to 20 March 1952 and in Operation "Emigrant" from 6 to 12 October 1952. In between these tasks, she made her first cruise to European waters in the summer of 1952, calling at Lisbon, Portugal, and Archachon, France, in June.

Continuing her reserve training cruises off the east coast through the summer of 1955, Tills cruised to Europe again and, after calling once more at Lisbon added Cadiz, Spain, to her itinerary. In 1956' the destroyer escort undertook a total of 13 naval reserve cruises

On 1 May 1958, Till$s home port was moved to Boston, Mass., shifting the locus of her operations northward to the northeastern coast of the United States and to the Canadian provinces of Nova Scotia and Newfoundland

On 1 September 1959, after the ship had conducted reserve training and refresher training cruises for over a year, her home port was moved still farther north to Portland, Maine. On 18 October 1959, Tills was decommissioned and placed in service as a unit of the Selected Reserve Training Program. Administrative control was accordingly shifted from Commander Destroyer Force, Atlantic Fleet, to Commandant, 1st Naval District.

After making weekend reserve cruises through the summer of 1961, Tills was recommissioned on 1 October 1961 in response to the Berlin Crisis, with Lt. W. L. Rich, USNR, in command. Following a six-week repair period at Newport, R.I., and refresher training in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, the ship operated out of her home port of Norfolk, Va.

After the crisis situation eased, Tills returned to her erstwhile home port of Portland, Maine, on 12 July 1962 and was decommissioned there on 1 August 1962. Attached to Reserve Destroyer Squadron 30 and Reserve Destroyer Escort Squadron, 1st Naval District Till$ operated out of South Portland, Maine, in an in-service basis and resumed making weekend reserve training cruises. On these brief voyages, she conducted antisubmarine exercises and steamed up and down the St. Lawrence Seaway. Moving to Newport on 20 October 1963, the ship underwent a one-month tender availability during which she received new torpedo tubes which replaced her old ones and her K-guns. She returned to Portland on 17 November and remained there for the remainder of the year.

During 1964, Tills participated in a number of diverse and interesting events. After a tender availability alongside Grand Canyon (AD-28) from 22 March to 18 April, Tills returned to the Naval Reserve Training Center at South Portland before getting underway for Boston on 13 June. A highlight of her reserve cruise was a four-day visit to the New York World's Fair.

After returning to her Maine base, the ship held an open house on 4 July and then visited Rockland, Maine, for the annual Rockland Seafood Festival on 3 August. On 28 August, Tills served as patrol ship for the annual Starboat Yacht Races off Winthrop, Mass

After subsequently participating in joint United States-Canadian antisubmarine exercises, the ship returned to the Naval Training Center at Portland for repairs before resuming her training cruises a mission she faithfully carried out for the remainder of her career.

Found unfit for further service, Tills was struck from the Navy list on 23 September 1968. On 3 April 1969, the ship was sunk as a target off the east coast.


Going Ashore: Naval Operations in Casco Bay During World War II (Part III)

(This is the third in a series of blog posts covering the various operations conducted in Maine during WWII. To read Parts I and II of George Stewart’s blog series about Casco Bay during WWII, go HERE and HERE. To read all other post by George, go HERE.)

By 1943, the Naval Auxiliary Landing Field and Navy Fuel Annex on Long Island were in full operation. The landing field provided training and support for the catapult-launched scout floatplanes that served as the “Eyes and Ears” of major combatant ships prior to the development of radar.

During one transit in July 1943, the USS Iowa (BB 61) ran aground on Soldiers Ledge in Hussey Sound.

Even though the requirements for escort ships in the Atlantic began to lag in 1944, it would prove to be the most active period in Casco Bayduring the war.

By 1944, the tide had turned in the Battle of the Atlantic. The Germans attempted a comeback using a new breathing device called a “schnorkel” which allowed operation of their diesel engines with the submarine cruising at periscope depth. They were unable to reestablish a dominant position in the Atlantic. However there was still action in the waters around Europe and there was some sporadic engagements off the East Coast.

Many of the East Coast based destroyers supported of the various operations in the European theater, including the invasion of Normandy and the invasions of Italy and Southern France in the Mediterranean. Many destroyers and destroyer escorts would be transferred to the Pacific, where they were in high demand. A number of destroyers were converted into high-speed minesweepers (DMS). There was also a need for more troop carrying capability for support of invasions in the Pacific. This need was filled by converting a number of destroyer escorts into high-speed transports (APD).

Despite these developments, 1944 was a very busy year in Casco Bay. In fact, there were more recorded ship visits (336) than in any other war year. The ship count included the battleships USS Arkansas (BB 33), USS Texas (BB 35), and USS Nevada (BB 36). Nevada was a World War I vintage battleship that was damaged at Pearl Harbor and subsequently restored to service. It went on to the Atlantic to support the invasion of Normandy. Ninety-four destroyers also appear on the list. Among them was nine of the new Sumner (DD 692) class and one Gearing (DD 710) class ship. These would be the last new classes of destroyers to enter service during the war. The largest group of ships on the list was the Des, with 178 of these ships appearing in the database for that year. It appears that virtually every DE that was assigned to the Atlantic Fleet during the war visited the bay for antisubmarine warfare training at some time or another.

There were lots of world-shaking events in 1945, including the deaths of FDR and Hitler, the end of the war in Europe, the use of the atom bomb, and finally, the surrender of the Japanese in September. As the year began, things were definitely winding down in the Atlantic culminating in the cessation of hostilities on May 8 (“VE-Day”). There were some U-Boat actions in the early part of the year. But the Battle of the Atlantic was won by the Allies. Overall the Germans had lost 768 U-Boats. The British had actually done the majority of the damage, with 561 U-Boats destroyed as compared by 177 by U.S. Forces. But these 177 kills were the major factor in the elimination of the U-Boat threat in the Western Atlantic.

A key factor in this was the establishment of the hunter-killer groups built around the escort carriers (CVE) and the DE’s. The most successful groups were built around the USS Bogue (CVE 9), USS Core (CVE 13), USS Card (CVE 11), USS Croatan (CVE 25), USS Block Island (CVE 21) and USS Guadalcanal (CVE 60). These vessels generally operated out of either Quonset Point, Rhode Island, or Norfolk, VA. There is no record of any of them ever stopping in Casco Bay, although it is probable that one or more made brief fuel stops. Yet virtually all of their escorts were in the bay at one time or another either for shakedown, upkeep, or specialized ASW training. Of the eleven carrier escorts that operated in the Atlantic, a torpedo sank only one, USS Block Island, on 29 May 1944. Since the end of World War II, there has been a tendency to overlook the contributions of these groups because the majority of the CVEs were decommissioned shortly after the war due to their inability to support jet aircraft.

There was a mass exodus of destroyers and DE’s from the Atlantic to the Pacific during the latter part of the year. Destroyers were in particular demand to make up for losses to Kamikazes. A number of these ships including many of those of the Sumner (DD 692) and Gearing (DD 710) classes were still in transit or on the building ways when the war ended with the Japanese surrender in Tokyo Bay on 2 September 1945.

By October 1945 the last of the 266 Liberty Ships were completed in South Portland and production ceased at the East and West Yards.

Although hostilities had ceased, there would still be a significant naval presence in Casco Bay up until early 1947. This will be discussed further in the next post in this series.


Going Ashore: Naval Operations in Casco Bay During World War II (Part IV)

(This is the fourth and final installment in a series of blog posts covering the various operations conducted in Maine during WWII. Click to read Parts I, II, and III of George Stewart’s blog series about Casco Bay during WWII. To read all other post by George, go HERE.)

This post is a continuation of the description of historical naval events that occurred in Casco Bay, Maine, during World War II. It includes a discussion of the postwar events that occurred in the bay between 1946 and 1947, plus photos of some of the historic ships that visited the bay during the war years.

The map of the area showing the basic geography and the major coastal defense facilities that appeared in Part I is repeated here for clarity. In general, the major afloat facilities including mooring, buoys, and anchorages were located on Long and Chebeague Islands with access to the open ocean by way of the gate in the anti-submarine net located in Hussey Sound, between Peaks and Long Island. Access to naval support activities in Portland was all by watercraft with trips up to approximately three to six miles. Downtown Portland also served as a “liberty port” for sailors whose ships were moored or anchored in the bay.

There are few records that cover the immediate postwar period in the bay. When the war ended, a rapid de-mobilization took place. Many ships that served during the war were decommissioned, although a significant number of these would return to service for the Korean War in 1951. Additionally, many of the ships that served in the Atlantic were transferred to the Pacific in 1945. By December 27, 1945, DESLANT consisted almost entirely of new Sumner and Gearing class destroyers, many of which were commissioned too late for significant wartime service. By this time, most shakedown and refresher training for East Coast-built ships was being conducted at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, where it would remain up into the 1990s.

The U.S. Navy considered making further use of the bay after the war. The bay had a number of disadvantages due to its remote location, the lack of suitable docking facilities, weather, and other concerns. There were naval shore side facilities in Portland, but waterfront facilities for mooring ships were very limited due to lack of space. During the war, ships were required to anchor or moor out in the bay. This made it necessary to provide transportation to and from Portland by ferryboats, often under rather unpleasant circumstances (as shown in the following illustration below):

Although Narragansett Bay had some of the same disadvantages, they essentially went away after the destroyer piers in Coddington Cove at Newport were completed. In retrospect, the disestablishment of the facilities in Casco Bay was probably the proper move.

In 1946, the Navy directed the Long Island Fuel Annex to be utilized for emergency refueling only. In 1962, it was placed in a caretaker status. Finally, in 1967, it was declared surplus and sold.

A total of 770 ships are on record as visiting Casco Bay between January 1941 and 1 January 1947. Destroyers and destroyer escorts comprised 480 of these ships. An additional 140 ships could have visited the bay during the aforementioned period, although it is not specifically stated in their histories. A total of 46 ships on the list were later wartime losses. Some historically significant ships that visited the bay during the war years are discussed in the following paragraphs.

BATTLESHIPS – A total of 15 battleships appear on the database. Five are still in existence as museum ships.

  • USS Texas (BB 35) – Museum ship in San Jacinto, Texas.
  • USS North Carolina (BB 55) – Museum ship in Wilmington, North Carolina.
  • USS Massachusetts (BB 59) – Museum ship in Fall River, Massachusetts.
  • USS Iowa (BB61) – Museum ship in San Pedro, California.
  • USS New Jersey (BB 62) – Museum ship at Camden, New Jersey.

USS Iowa (BB 61) visited Casco Bay for operational training in 1943. During that period, the ship ran aground when passing through Hussey Sound between Peaks and Long Island. Later that year, she carried President Roosevelt to and from a conference in Teheran. In 1944, the ship was transferred to the Pacific. Iowa saw active service in the Atlantic from 1984-1990. During that period, she suffered a major explosion in Turret #2 with the loss of forty-nine lives. Iowa is now serving as a museum ship in San Pedro, California.

CARRIERS – Since the bulk of the action involving carriers occurred in the Pacific during the war, only three carriers are on record as having visited Casco Bay. An additional five escort carriers (CVE) appear in the database.

  • USS Ranger (CV 4) – First ship designed from keel up as a carrier.
  • USS Yorktown (CV 5) – Sunk in Pacific in 1942.
  • USS Wasp (CV 7) – Sunk in Pacific in 1942.

USS Ranger (CV 4) was the first ship designed from the keel up as a carrier. She entered service in 1934. It visited Casco Bay in 1941 as part of the Neutrality Patrol. Ranger returned in 1943 prior to supporting the invasion of North Africa. For much of the war, this was the only large carrier assigned to the Atlantic Fleet. Ranger was transferred to the Pacific in 1944.

CRUISERS – A total of twenty-two cruisers appear in the database.

  • USS Augusta (CL 31) – Carried FDR to meeting with Churchill at Placentia Bay for signing of Atlantic Charter in 1941.
  • USS Juneau (CL 52) – Sunk in the Pacific in 1942.

USS Juneau (CL 52) performed training exercises in Casco Bay shortly after entering service in 1942 after which it was transferred to the Pacific shortly thereafter. A torpedo off Guadalcanal sank her on 13 November 1942. This was the famed ship that the five Sullivan brothers served aboard. All were lost at sea. This incident resulted in modifications to the military “Sole Survivor” policy to prevent a reoccurrence.

DESTROYERS – A total of 263 destroyers are listed in the database. Of these, forty-seven 47 were “Four Pipers” (also referred to as “Flush Deckers”) of the Wickes and Clemson classes. These ships were carryovers from the World War I era having entered service right after the end of the war. The largest single group was the destroyers built between 1934 and 1942, with 116 ships encompassing ten different classes on the list. These ships can be recognized by their raised forecastles and in the pre-war classes, portholes in the sides. The list also includes sixty Fletcher Class ships built between 1942 and 1943 and thirty-nine Sumner and Gearing Class ships built between 1944 and 1945. These ships reverted to the “Flush Deck” configuration. Some historic ships on the list include:

  • USS Greer (DD 145) – Involved in first incident with U-Boat in 1941.
  • USS Reuben James (DD 245) – First US ship loss during war in 1941.
  • USS Hobson (DD 464) – Sunk in collision with USS Wasp in 1952.
  • USS Kearney (DD 432) – Torpedoed while on Neutrality Patrol in 1941.
  • USS Niblack (DD 424) – First action with a U-Boat in 1941.
  • USS Thompson (DD 627) – Served as the setting for The Caine Mutiny.
  • USS Charles Ausburne (DD 570) – Flagship of famous “ Little Beaver Squadron” under Capt Arleigh Burke.
  • USS Spence (DD 512) – Sunk in a typhoon in Pacific in 1943.
  • USS Gyatt (DD 712) – Converted into world’s first guided missile ship in 1956.

USS Reuben James (DD 245) was a Clemson Class destroyer built in 1920. The ship served on Neutrality Patrol where she was sunk by a torpedo off Argentia on 23 October 1941 before the US entered the war. The last stop before she sank was Casco Bay. Rueben James was the first US ship loss of World War II.

USS Kearney (DD 432) was a Gleaves Class destroyer that entered service in 1940. Kearney was torpedoed while on neutrality patrol prior to outbreak of war in October 1941. She returned to duty and served as convoy escort and patrols in support of invasions of Italy and Southern France. She was sent to the Pacific in 1945.

USS Charles Ausburne (DD 570)

USS Charles Ausburne (DD 570) was a Fletcher Class Destroyer built in Orange, Texas. She entered service in 1943 and underwent shakedown training in Casco Bay. Shortly thereafter, she was transferred to the Pacific and served as the flagship of the famous “Little Beaver” Squadron under future Chief of Naval Operations Arliegh Burke.

DESTROYER ESCORTS – Next to the destroyers, the destroyer escorts formed the second largest groups of ships to visit Casco Bay during the war. There are 223 ships on the list that visited the bay between 1944 and 1945. Those ships represented five different ship classes. USS Tills (DE 748) was mentioned in the first part of the blog series. It appears that virtually every East Coast built DE visited the bay for shakedown or ASW training at one time or another. The majority of these ships served in the Atlantic on convoy escort, ASW patrols, and as members of hunter-killer groups. A number of them were assigned to naval reserve training duties after the war. Some historically prominent ships that appear on the list include:

  • USS Farquhar (DE 139) – Last ship to sink a U-Boat in 1945.
  • USS Stewart (DE 238) – Museum ship in San Jacinto, Texas.
  • USS Vance (DE 387) – Involved in book, The Arnheiter Affair.
  • USS Mason (DE 529) – First naval vessel with predominantly black crew.
  • USS Edward H. Allen (DE 531) – Rescued survivors from liner Andrea Doria sinking in 1956.

USS Stewart (DE 238) was built in Houston, Texas. The ship entered service in 1943. During the war, Stewart performed duties as a convoy escort and on ASW patrols in the Atlantic. It was transferred to the Pacific in 1945. The ship now serves as a museum ship in Galveston, Texas. In 2007, it was added to the National Register of Historic Places. She is mentioned in a separate blog on this website. Stewart is one of only two World War II-built destroyer escorts still in existence.

REPAIR/COMMAND SHIPS

  • USS Denebola (AD 12) – DESLANT flagship from 1941-1944.
  • USS Yosemite (AD 19) – DESLANT flagship from 1946-1969. Served until 1994.
  • USS Vulcan (AR 5) – First USN ship with female crewmembers in 1978.
  • USS Alcor (AG 34) – DESLANT flagship in 1944-1945.
  • USS Biscayne (AGC 18) – DESLANT flagship in early 1946.

USS Yosemite (AD 19) was a Dixie Class destroyer tender built in Tampa, Florida. The ship entered service in 1944. Yosemite was initially assigned to wartime duties in the Pacific. However, it was transferred to Casco Bay in 1946 where it assumed duties as the COMDESLANT Flagship during the period where the base was closing down. In 1947, the ship was transferred to Newport, Rhode Island where she continued to serve as the DESLANT flagship until 1969. Yosemite was to remain in active service as a destroyer tender on the East Coast and in the Mediterranean until decommissioned in 1994 after fifty years of continuous service.

MINESWEEPERS – There are thirty-six minesweepers in the database. Most were in Casco Bay for shakedown and ASW training. Unlike their post war counterparts that were (and are) of wooden hull construction, World War II minesweepers had steel hulls.

SUBMARINES – Thirty-three submarines appear on the list. The majority were home ported in New London and provided to COMDESLANT for ASW training purposes. They were generally of obsolescent types built between 1918 and 1926. Two of them were captured Italian subs used for training purposes during the latter part of the war.

The S-25 was built in 1923 and transferred to Great Britain and later to Poland. Allied Escorts later mistakenly sank the submarine off Norway in 1942.

PATROL VESSELS – Seventeen of the thirty-eight patrol vessels that appear on the list were Tacoma Class Patrol Frigates (PF). These vessels entered service between 1944 and 1945, too late to have a significant impact on the war. Many wound up being sold to foreign navies. Others were converted yachts (PY) that were used as flagships. Some historically significant vessels on the list include:

  • USS Eagle (PE 56) – Sunk by U-853 off Cape Elizabeth in 1945.
  • USS Vixen (PG 53) – Converted yacht. Served as CINCLANTFLEET flagship in 1942-1944.
  • USS Zircon (PY 16) – Converted yacht. Served as CINCLANTFLEET flagship in 1944-1945.
  • USS Mizpah (PY 29) – Converted yacht. Served as DESLANT flagship in 1945.

The USS Eagle (PE 56) was a World War I-built patrol vessel. It was one of sixty “Eagle Boats” built under a plan initiated by Henry Ford in a shipyard on the River Rouge near Detroit, Michigan in 1918-1919. PE 56 was one of only seven of the vessels that saw service in World War II. She was torpedoed off Cape Elizabeth, right outside Portland Harbor by U-853. However, there is still some debate as to whether or not she was torpedoed or sunk by an internal explosion.

COAST GUARD – During World War II, the Coast Guard served as an integral part of the Navy. A total of fifty-one Coast Guard vessels appear on the list. A number of these vessels had very long service lives. Two remain on display as museum ships. Note that Coast Guard light ships were taken off station during the war and used for other purposes. The list includes seven Treasury Class cutters, several of which served into the 1980s. Some historic vessels include:

  • USCG Ingham (WPG 35) – Museum ship in Charleston, South Carolina.
  • USCG Taney (WHEC 37) – Museum ship in Baltimore, Maryland.
  • USCG Nantucket (LV 112) – Nantucket light ship – Served as an examination ship in Portland during the war.
  • USCG Portland (LV 90) – Portland light ship.

USCG Duane (WPG 33) was a Treasury Class Cutter that entered service in 1936. She remained on active service until 1985. The ship is shown above in its wartime and peacetime configurations. Duane was based in Portland from 1978-1985.

A large number of service craft were based in Casco Bay during the war in order to provide the necessary services to ships moored out in the bay.

The vessel shown above entered service as the Casco Bay Lines steamer SS Aucocisco in 1897. The ship’s functions were to carry passengers and freight to the various islands in the bay. In 1942, the U.S. Navy took it over and re-named her USS Green Island (YFB 32). During WWII, she served as a ferryboat based in Portland to and from naval vessels moored or anchored out in the bay. Along with its sister vessel the Penobscot Bay steamer North Haven (YAG 12), Green Island served as a large “liberty boats”. A trip down the bay covered distances up to six miles from Portland and included multiple stops, often under unpleasant weather conditions. The steamer was coal fired. After the war, Green Island was returned to Casco Bay Lines where it continued to serve under its original name of Aucocisco until 1952. I rode it to and from Peaks Island a number of times in the post war era.

The above photo shows the area in Casco Bay where the moorings and anchorages were located at it appears today. This photo was taken from the Northern end of Peaks Island in 2005.

REFERENCES: The following references were used in preparation for the presentations delivered at museums in the Portland area in 2006 and 2009.

  • Dictionary of American Naval Fighting Ships Online (DANFS)
  • NAVSOURCE Photo Archives
  • The Official Chronology of the U.S. Navy in World War II
  • U.S. Naval Historical Center (Now the Naval History and Heritage Command)
  • U.S. Naval Institute
  • United States Coast Guard
  • Naval Vessel Register
  • Hyper War, U.S. Navy in World War II, Ships of the U.S. Navy, 1940-1945
  • Dreadnoughts to Greyhounds: Ships of the US Navy (Casco Bay)
  • U.S. Coast Guard Cutter List
  • Casco Bay Online, World War II, Joel W. Eastman
  • Eastern Sea Frontier War Diary

PUBLICATIONS

  • Jane’s Fighting Ships of World War II, Crescent Books, 1992 Reprint
  • Conway’s All the World’s Fighting Ships, 1947-1982, Part I, US Naval Institute
  • U.S. Destroyers, Revised Edition, Friedman, US Naval Institute Press,2004
  • United States Navy Destroyers of World War II, Blandford Press, 1983
  • Allied Escort Ships of World War II, Elliot, Naval Institute Press, 1977
  • History of United States Naval Operations in World War II, Samuel Elliot Morison, Castle Books, 2001 Reprint
  • The Two Ocean War, Samuel Elliot Morison,1963
  • Tin Cans: The True Story of the Fighting Destroyers of World War II, Theodore Roscoe, US Naval Institute, 1953
  • The Defeat of the German U-Boats, Syrette, University of South Carolina Press, 1994
  • The Naval War Against Hitler, Donald Mcintyre, 1971
  • The Casco Bay Islands, 1850-2000, Kimberly E. MacIsaac, Arcadia Publications, 2004

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15 Comments

I was wondering if you could help me track down some historical info around Casco Bay in the days immediately after V-E day in WWII. All my Google searches have come up empty. Here’s the story that was told to me when I was very young (I’m 60 y.o. now.)
My uncle was an enlisted man on board a Destroyer Escort (name unknown) stationed off Casco Bay. 2 days after V-E day, about 3 miles off Outer Green Island, they got a sonar contact and proceeded to put 2 depth charges into the water. After they went off, up came a German U-Boat which they captured.
My cousin tells a similar story with just a few of the details being different. But in all my Google searches I couldn’t come up with any U-Boat capture or surrender story which matched the details of this one. It’s like we have a mystery U-Boat story here and everybody loves a mystery.
Now if this was all I had to go on, we could write it off as some fanciful tall tale from long ago. But here’s the amazing detail which proves there is some truth to it. I’ve got evidence. This is how the story, as told to me, continued.:There were 3 Nazi flags on board that U-boat. They were the marine version, the one with the Iron Cross in the upper left hand corner. One flag (supposedly) went to an Admiral from Portland, a second to an Admiral from Boston and a third went somewhere else. To make a long story, short, one of those U-boat flags has passed into our family and we still have it. Not me, personally, I don’t have it and I haven’t seen it in years but I know it exists because when I was in 2nd grade, way back in the day, I was allowed to take it to school with me and it was my Show and Tell” exhibit that day. That’s not something you’d forget or mess up.
So here are the questions I have. 1) If the story is true, then why isn’t there any evidence or accounts of this remarkable story? 2) Maybe the flag came from one of the 4 U-boats that surrendered at Portsmouth, NH in the days following V-E day? Perhaps. But then why do we have this amazing story about the capture and how does one explain how my uncle, an enlisted man who was only 20 y.o. at the time, get possession of the flag? Obviously, it meant something to him beyond being a very cool souvenir so why was he motivated to acquire it if the story wasn’t true? (Again, there are more details of the whole story I have left out.)
Until I am persuaded otherwise, I’m going to go with this story as it was told to me by my uncle (unfortunately, he died a long time ago.) That means, we’ve got a mystery U-boat on our hands. But there has to be some kind of paperwork in the archives of the Navy because captured U-Boats don’t just disappear.
If you could help me solve this mystery, I’d be much appreciative.
Thanks,

I did a lot of research when I was putting together my presentation including books and web sites but I never came across this incident. An obvious place to start is uboat.net. It gives comprehensive lists of captured and surrendered U-Boats but does not give much detail. I expect that you may have already visited this site. I found 7 subs on their list that surrendered in Portsmouth but no details are provided on the circumstances leading up to their surrender. Subs on the list included U-2513, U-234, U-873, U-805, U-1228, U-1406, and U-505. I suspect that it was one of these but I have not been able to pin it down. I will keep looking.

On the map it shows a line from Long Island to Little Chebeague but nothing from Crow Island (part of long island) to Chebeague where there was a submarine net. Also, I heard that there was a sub net on either Sturdivant or Basket Island. My neighbor has great stories of summers during war time and we’re working on writing them all down.

I am looking for a sailor stationed in Portland Maine in 1944. His name is James Edward Staten. He was from the state of Texas and he was there in the middle of 1944. Any information would be appreciated.

As a life-long resident on Casco Bay’s eastern shore (Small Point, West Point and Sebasco) and on the waters therein for 50 years. For 10 years I worked one small trawler (“Dragger”) named “Jackie B.”, which according to rumor started out as a 45 footer, but was cut in half amidships about 1940, and 10 feet was added to her waist making her a fast (16+ knots) albeit very limber, 55′ LOA by 13′ w by 7-1/2 draft vessel with a Gray Marine 671 w/ a 2 to 1 reduction.
Being thus improved she was supposedly then used as a”sub-chaser” designed to harass but I suspect otherwise unable to attack these enemy intruders, instead to either drive them off or keep them busy until a true sub-killer could be called in to intervene.
Is there any such truth to these tales, and if so is there any record of vessels thus commandeered?
Would there be any photos of same.

When putting together my Casco Bay database of ship visits I found one record of a vessel that met the description. It was the converted fishing trawler Ave Maria which was assigned to the First Naval District. It performed anti submarine patrols between Boston and Portland between 1942 and 1944. The source for this information was the account of a crew member on the USS Boyd. I will look further into this and see if I can come up with any more information concerning this subject.
George Stewart

Interesting information. Thanks. Between 1940 and 1943 I lived on Greenwood Street on Peaks Island. I was 3 when we moved there in 1940. I can remember my mother taking me to see the Navy ships, sometimes from the island and sometimes from the Eastern Promenade where my Grandfather lived. Sometimes we would see many anchored in the bay and the next day most would be gone. We would also see them when taking the boat to Portland. We also spend a lot of time on the beach between Peaks Island and Cushing Island and seem to remember a submarine net between the islands that on occasion was opened by a small boat. Do you know if that was a net that was opened to let ships in and out or am I just imagining it? Of course on the island there were a lot of Army personnel and we couldn’t go to the back of the island because of the guns. For kids it was great fun to live there at that time. Later I served as a Sonarman on destroyers out of Newport. USS Power DD-839 most of the time with a short time on USS Daly DD-519.

Peter, I remember you. My parents were Malcolm and Dottie Kennedy. We lived at 15 Oak Ave., about 60-80 yards away from you on Greenwood. I was born in 1936, a year before you, and was in Sub-Primary (Kindergarten) when the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor. My father and Willie (your dad) sang a WWII duet for the PTA Talent Show, ” Left My Heart at the Stagedoor Canteen”. I have a picnic photo of you and me.

Hi Peter. You are not going to believe our connections. My grandparents, Harry & May Wallace lived on Greenwood Street in the big house on your right as you went up the hill. That is where my mother grew up and I spent my summers when I was a kid. I was born in 1935 and I remember the war years very clearly. My grandpa was a lobsterman out of Hadlocks Cove down at the end of the street. Once the net was in place he had to do all of his lobstering inside the net. Another problem was oil soaked beaches from ships being sunk offshore. I do not remember type of gate in the net. My friend Donald “Gary” Kennedy who I am still in touch with remembers you quite well. I have a copy of his auto biography in which there is a photo of you and your family having a picnic on the beach along with the Kennedys. My Uncle Harry, who drove Army boats during the war, was the next owner of your house on Greenwood Street. I grew up in Massachusetts and my parents retired to the island in 1959. I still have my connections to the island and we actually rented my grandparents’ house on Greenwood Street for a week last year. If you give me some contact information I can give you a lot more details.


Tills DE-748 - History


Joint Base Pearl Harbor-Hickam, Hawaii - April 2019


Pearl Harbor, Hawaii - April 2019


Pearl Harbor, Hawaii - April 2019


Pearl Harbor, Hawaii - April 2019


Pearl Harbor, Hawaii - April 2019


Pearl Harbor, Hawaii - April 2019


Pearl Harbor, Hawaii - April 2019


Pearl Harbor, Hawaii - April 2019


Pearl Harbor, Hawaii - April 2019


Ketchikan, Alaska - March 2019


San Diego, California - March 2019


San Diego, California - March 2019


December 2018


change of command ceremony - San Diego, California - November 2018


Pacific Ocean - December 2016


Pacific Ocean - December 2016


Pacific Ocean - December 2016


San Diego, California - December 2016


San Diego, California - December 2016


San Diego, California - December 2016


San Diego, California - December 2016


San Diego, California - December 2016


San Diego, California - December 2016


San Diego, California - December 2016


San Diego, California - December 2016


Balboa, Panama - November 2016


Mayport, Florida - October 2016


Mayport, Florida - October 2016


Norfolk, Virginia - October 2016


Chesapeake Bay, Maryland - October 2016


Chesapeake Bay, Maryland - October 2016


Chesapeake Bay, Maryland - October 2016


Chesapeake Bay, Maryland - October 2016


commissioning ceremony - Baltimore, Maryland - October 16, 2016


commissioning ceremony - Baltimore, Maryland - October 16, 2016


awaiting commissioning - Baltimore, Maryland - October 2016


awaiting commissioning - Baltimore, Maryland - October 2016


awaiting commissioning - Baltimore, Maryland - October 2016


awaiting commissioning - Baltimore, Maryland - October 2016


Baltimore, Maryland - October 2016


October 2016


Newport, Rhode Island - September 2016


Newport, Rhode Island - September 2016


Newport, Rhode Island - September 2016


Newport, Rhode Island - September 2016


Pippsburg, Maine - September 2016


Pippsburg, Maine - September 2016


Pippsburg, Maine - September 2016


Pippsburg, Maine - September 2016


Pippsburg, Maine - September 2016


April 2016


April 2016


acceptance trials - April 2016


acceptance trials - April 2016


Bath, Maine - March 2016


Bath, Maine - March 2016


Bath, Maine - March 2016


sea tests and trials - Atlantic Ocean - December 2015


sea tests and trials - Atlantic Ocean - December 2015


Kennebec River - December 2015


Kennebec River - December 2015


christening ceremony at Bath Iron Works, Bath, Maine - April 12, 2014


USS Zumwalt was launched at Bath Iron Works, Maine - October 28, 2013 (General Dynamics photo via USN)


USS Zumwalt was launched at Bath Iron Works, Maine - October 28, 2013 (General Dynamics photo via USN)


USS Zumwalt was launched at Bath Iron Works, Maine - October 28, 2013 (General Dynamics photo via USN)


January 2013 (General Dynamics photo via USN)


the 1000-ton deckhouse of the future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) is craned toward the deck of the ship
to be integrated with the ship's hull at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works - December 2012


the 1000-ton deckhouse of the future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) is craned toward the deck of the ship
to be integrated with the ship's hull at General Dynamics Bath Iron Works - December 2012


The deckhouse for the future USS Zumwalt (DDG 1000) sits on a barge at Norfolk Naval Station after being diverted due to weather during transit
from Huntington Ingalls Industries' Gulfport Facility in Mississippi to General Dynamics-Bath Iron Works shipyard in Maine - November 2012

Biographical Summary (from the US Naval Historical center)

Prominent Assignments:

Nominated on 14 April 1970 by President Nixon to serve as Chief of Naval Operations. Became CNO with rank of Admiral from 1 July 1970 to 1 July 1974.

Served as Commander U. S. Naval Forces, Vietnam and Chief of the Naval Advisory Group, U. S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam, from 1 October 1968 to 15 May 1970.

As Director of the Chief of Naval Operations Systems Analysis Group from August 1966 to August 1968, he organized and directed the Systems Analysis Division and served as Deputy Scientific Officer to the Center for Naval Analyses.

Served as Commander Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla SEVEN from July 1965 to July 1966.


Education:
1939 Valedictorian of Tulare High School, Tulare, CA
1939 Rutherford Preparatory School, Long Beach, CA
1942 Cum Laude Graduate of U.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, MD
1953 Naval War College, Newport, RI
1962 National War College, Washington, DC


Other Highlights:
Eagle Scout.
Served as Commanding Officer of the first ship built from the keel up as a guided-missile ship USS Dewey (DLG-14)
Was prize crew officer of captured Japanese gunboat Ataka, captured at mouth of Yangtze River near end of WW II.
At age 44, the youngest naval officer ever promoted to Rear Admiral.
At age 49, the youngest four-star Admiral in U. S. naval history, and the youngest to serve as Chief of Naval Operations.

Elmo Russell Zumwalt, Jr., was born in San Francisco, California, on 29 November 1920, son of Dr. E. H. Zumwalt and Dr. Frances Zumwalt. He attended Tulare (California) Union High School, where he was an Eagle Scout and Class Valedictorian and the Rutherford Preparatory School, at Long Beach, California, before his appointment to the U. S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland, from his native state in 1939. As a Midshipman ho was President of the Trident Society, Vice President of the Quarterback Society, twice winner of the June Week Public Speaking Contest (1940, 1941) , Company Commander in 1941 and Regimental Three Striper in 1942, and participated in intercollegiate debating. Graduated with distinction and commissioned Ensign on 19 June 1942, with the Class of 1943, he subsequently progressed to the rank of Admiral, to date from 1 July 1970.

Following graduation from the Naval Academy in June 1942, he joined the destroyer USS Phelps, and in August 1943 was detached f or instruction in the Operational Training Command, Pacific, at San Francisco, California. In January 1944 he reported on board the USS Robinson, and for "heroic service as Evaluator in the Combat Information Center. (of that destroyer), in action against enemy Japanese battleships during the Battle for Leyte Gulf, 25 October 1944.. ." he was awarded the Bronze Star with Combat "V." The citation further states:

"During a torpedo attack on enemy battleships, Lieutenant Zumwalt furnished information indispensable to the success of the attack. "

After the cessation of hostilities in August 1945, until December 8th of that year, he commanded (as prize crew officer) HIMJS Ataka, a 1200-ton Japanese river gunboat with two hundred officers and men. In that capacity he took the first ship since the outbreak of World War II, flying the United States flag, up the Whangpoo River to Shanghai. There they helped to restore order and assisted in disarming the Japanese.

He next served as Executive Officer of the destroyer USS Saufley, and in March 1946 was transferred to the destroyer USS Zellars, as Executive Officer and Navigator. In January 1948 he was assigned to the Naval Reserve Officers Training Corps Unit of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where he remained until June 1950. That month he assumed command of USS Tills, in commission in reserve status. That destroyer escort was placed in full active commission at Charleston Naval Shipyard on 21 November 1950, and he continued to command her until March 1951, when he joined the battleship USS Wisconsin as Navigator.

"For meritorious service as Navigator of USS Wisconsin during combat operations against enemy North Korean and Chinese Communist forces in the Korean Theater from 23 November 1951 to 30 March 1952. " he received a Letter of Commendation, with Ribbon and Combat "V," from Commander Seventh Fleet. The letter continues: "As Navigator his competence and untiring diligence in assuring safe navigation of the ship enabled the commanding officer to devote the greater part of his attention to planning and gunfire Operations. His performance of duty was consistently Superior in bringing the ship through dangerously mined and restricted waters, frequently under adverse conditions and poor visibility. He assisted in the planning of the combat operations. (and) piloted Wisconsin into the closest possible inshore positions in which maximum effect could be obtained by gunfire. "

Detached from USS Wisconsin in June 1952, he attended the Naval War College, Newport, Rhode Island, and in June 1953 reported as Head of the Shore and Overseas Bases Section, Bureau of Naval Personnel, Navy Department, Washington, D. C. He also served as Officer and Enlisted Requirements Officer and as Action Officer on Medicare Legislation. Completing that tour of duty in July 1955, he assumed command of the destroyer USS Arnold J. Isbell, participating in two deployments to the Seventh Fleet. In this assignment he was commended by the Commander, Cruiser-Destroyer Forces, U. S. Pacific Fleet for winning the Battle Efficiency Competition for his ship and for winning Excellence Awards in Engineering, Gunnery, Antisubmarine Warfare, and Operations. In July 1957 he returned to the Bureau of Naval Personnel for further duty. In December 1957 he was transferred to the Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy (Personnel and Reserve Forces), and served as Special Assistant for Naval Personnel until November 1958, then as Special Assistant and Naval Aide until August 1959.

Ordered to the first ship built from the keel up as a guided missile ship, USS Dewey (DLG-14), building at the Bath (Maine) Iron Works, he assumed command of that guided missile frigate at her commissioning in December 1959, and commanded her until June 1961. During this period of his command, Dewey earned the Excellence Award in Engineering, Supply, Weapons, and was runner-up in the Battle Efficiency Competition. He was a student at the National War College, Washington, D. C., during the 1961-1962 class year. In June he was assigned to the Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense (International Security Affairs), Washington, D. C., where he served first as Desk Officer for France, Spain and Portugal, then as Director of Arms Control and Contingency Planning for Cuba. From December 1963 until 21 June 1965 he served as Executive Assistant and Senior Aide to the Honorable Paul H. Nitze, Secretary of the Navy. For duty in his tour in the offices of the Secretary of Defense and the Secretary of the Navy, he was awarded the Legion of Merit.

After his selection for the rank of Rear Admiral, he assumed command in July 1965 of Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla Seven. "For exceptionally meritorious service. " in that capacity, he was awarded a Gold Star in lieu of a Second Legion of Merit. In August 1966 he became Director of the Chief of Naval Operations Systems Analysis Group, Washington, D. C., and for "exceptionally meritorious service. as Director, Systems Analysis Division, Office of the Chief of Naval Operations, Deputy Scientific Officer to the Center for Naval Analyses, during the period from August 1966 to August 1968. " he was awarded the Distinguished Service Medal. The citation further states in part:

"Rear Admiral Zumwalt, by direction of the Chief of Naval Operations, established the Systems Analysis Division and rapidly developed it into a highly effective, responsive organization. Under his leadership, the division has assisted in generating within the Navy a better understanding of requirements, problems and a more effective presentation of those requirements in major program areas which will strongly influence the combat capabilities of U. S. Naval Forces through the next generation. (He) has displayed exceptional acumen, integrity, tact and diplomacy as personal representative of the Chief of Naval Operations, not only in dealings within the Department of Defense, but also in testifying before Congressional Committees. Among the major analyses completed under his direct supervision were the major Fleet Escort, Antisubmarine Warfare Force Level, Tactical Air, Surface-to-Surface Missile, and War-at-Sea Studies. Additionally, under Rear Admiral Zumwalt's guidance, the Center for Naval Analyses has been restructured, and its methodologies clearly defined with such precision as to ensure that completed studies will reflect thoroughness, comprehensiveness and accuracy when subjected to closest scrutiny. "

In September 1968 he became Commander Naval Forces, Vietnam and Chief of the Naval Advisory Group, U. S. Military Assistance Command, Vietnam. President Richard M. Nixon nominated him as Chief of Naval Operations on 14 April 1970. Upon being relieved as Commander Naval Forces, Vietnam, on 15 May 1970, he was awarded a Gold Star in lieu of a second Distinguished Service Medal for exceptionally meritorious service. He assumed command as Chief of Naval Operations on 1 July 1970 and retired from that position on 1 July 1974. In 1976, he unsuccessfully ran as a Democratic candidate for the Senate from Virginia. Later he held the presidency of the American Medical Building Corporation in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.

Admiral Zumwalt died on 2 January 2000 at the Duke University Medical Center in Durham, NC. His home was in Arlington, Virginia. He was married to the former Mouza Coutelais-du-Roche of Harbin, Manchuria, and they had two sons, Elmo R. Zumwalt III, who died of cancer in 1988, and James Gregory Zumwalt, and two daughters, Ann F. Zumwalt Coppola and Mouza C. Zumwalt-Weathers. He was also survived by six grandchildren.


Transcript of Naval Service:
29 Nov 1920 Born in San Francisco, CA
7 Jun 1939 Midshipman, U. S. Naval Academy
19 Jun 1942 Ensign
1 May 1943 Lieutenant (junior grade)
1 Jul 1944 Lieutenant
1 Apr 1950 Lieutenant Commander
1 Feb 1955 Commander
1 Jul 1961 Captain
1 Jul 1965 Rear Admiral
1 Oct 1968 Vice Admiral
1 Jul 1970 Admiral
1 Jul 1974 Retired

Ships and Stations: from - to
USS Phelps (DD-360) Jun 1942 - Aug 1943
USS Robinson (DD-562) Jan 1944 - Oct 1945
USS Saufley (DD-465) Dec 1945 - Mar 1946
USS Zellars (DD-777) Mar 1946 - Jan 1948
NROTC Unit, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC (Asst. Professor of Naval Science) Jan 1948 - Jun 1950
USS Tills (DE-748) (Commanding Officer) Jun 1950 - Mar 1951
USS Wisconsin (BB-64) (Navigator) Mar 1951 - Jun 1952
Naval War College, Newport, RI (student) Jun 1952 - Jun 1953
Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, DC Jun 1953 - Jul 1955
USS Arnold J. Isbell (DD-869) (Commanding Officer) Jul 1955 - Jul 1957
Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington, DC (Lieutenant Officer) Jul 1957 - Dec 1957
Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Personnel and Reserve Forces (Special Assistant for Naval Personnel) Dec 1957 - Nov 1958
(Special Assistant and Naval Aide) Nov 1958 - Aug 1959
USS Dewey (DLG-14) (Commanding Officer) Dec 1959 - Jun 1961
National War College, Washington, DC (student) Aug 1961 - Jun 1962
Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for ISA (Desk Officer) Jun 1962 - Dec 1963
Office of the Secretary of the Navy (Executive Assistant and Senior Aide) Dec 1963 - Jun 1965
Commander, Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla SEVEN Jul 1965 - Jul 1966
Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (Director, Systems Analysis Division) Aug 1966 - Aug 1968
Commander, U.S. Naval Forces, Vietnam and Chief, Naval Advisory Group, Vietnam Sep 1968 - May 1970
Chief of Naval Operations Jul 1970 - Jul 1974


Medals And Decorations:
Medal of Freedom (the U.S.'s highest civilian award)
Distinguished Service Medal with two Gold Stars
Legion of Merit with one Gold Star
Bronze Star with Combat "V"
Navy Commendation Medal with Combat "V"
Navy Unit Citation
China Service Medal
American Defense Service Medal with Bronze Letter "A"
American Campaign Medal
Navy Occupation Service Medal
National Defense Service Medal with one star
Korean Service Medal with two stars
Vietnam Service Medal with seven stars (1 Silver, 2 Bronze)
World War II Victory Medal
Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with seven stars (1 Silver, 2 Bronze)
Order of Military Merit (Korea) - Third Class
Order of the Rising Sun (Japan) - First Class
National Order of Vietnam Medal - Third Class
Vietnamese Gallantry Cross with Palm
Vietnamese Navy Distinguished Service Order - First Class
Philippine Republic Presidential Unit Citation
Korean Presidential Unit Citation
Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm Unit Citation
Philippine Liberation Ribbon with two stars
United Nations Service Medal
Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal with Device
Gran Maestre De La Onion De Mayo, Al Merito Naval (Argentina)
Naval Merit in the Grade of High Officer (Bolivia)
Medal of Grand Official of the Order of Naval Merit (Brazil)
Order of the, Southern Cross, Degree of Grand Cross (Brazil)
Great Star of Military Merit of Chile
The Order of Admirante Padilla in the Grade of Gran Official (Colombia)
Order of Merit of Duarte, Sanchez y Mella, in the Grade of Great Silver Cross (Dominican. Republic)
Legion D'Honneur in the Rank of Commander (France)
Grand Cross - Second Class of the Order of Merit (Germany)
Grand Cross of the Division of King George I (Greece)
Jalasena First Class (Indonesia)
Grande Croce Del Ordine Al Merito Repubblica Italiana Medale (Italy)
Order of Orange - Nassau (Military Division) (Grand Officer) (Netherlands)
Knighthood Grand Cross of the Royal Order of the Sword (Sweden)
Naval Order of Merit First Class (Venezuela)
First Class Civil Actions Medal (Vietnam)
Order of National Security Merit Tong-Il (Korea)
Grand Cross of St. Olav (Norway)
Commander in the Order of Leopold (Belgium)

Honorary Degrees:
Doctor of Law, Villanova University
Doctor of Human Letters, United States International University
Doctor of Public Service, Central Michigan University

Civilian Activities:
Visiting University Professor:
Vanderbilt University, 1974-1975
(Department of Political Science Graduate School of Management)

Guest Lecturer:
University of Pennsylvania, 1974-1975
(Political. Science Department)
Stanford University, 1974
(Graduate. School of Management Graduate School of Journalism, Political Science Department)

Member of the Board of Directors:
Phelps-Stokes Fund
Esmark, Inc.
Presidential Classroom for Young Americans
Organization Resources Counselors, Inc.
Basic Industries, Inc.

Many of the ship's features were originally developed under the DD21 program ("21st Century Destroyer"). In 2001, Congress cut the DD-21 program by half as part of the SC21 program. To save it, the acquisition program was renamed as DD(X) and heavily reworked. The initial funding allocation for DDG-1000 was included in the National Defense Authorization Act of 2007. By February 2008, a $1.4 billion contract had been awarded to Bath Iron Works in Bath, Maine, and full rate production officially began a year later, on 11 February 2009.

In July 2008, a construction timetable was set for General Dynamics to deliver the ship in April 2013, with a March 2015 target date for Zumwalt to meet her initial operating capability but, by 2012 the planned completion and delivery of the vessel was delayed to the 2014 fiscal year. The first section of the ship was laid down on the slipway at Bath Iron Works on 17 November 2011, by which point, fabrication of the ship was over 60% complete. The naming ceremony was planned for 19 October 2013, but was canceled due to the United States federal government shutdown of 2013. The vessel was launched on 29 October 2013.

In January 2014, Zumwalt began to prepare for heavy weather trials, to see how the ship and her instrumentation react to high winds, stormy seas, and adverse weather conditions. The ship's new wave-piercing inverted bow and tumblehome hull configuration reduce her radar cross-section. Tests involved lateral and vertical accelerations and pitch and roll. Later tests included fuel on-loading, data center tests, propulsion events, X-band radar evaluations, and mission systems activation to finalize integration of electronics. These all culminated in builders' trials and acceptance trials, with delivery for US Navy tests in late 2014, and with initial operating capability (IOC) to be reached by 2016.

Zumwalt's first commanding officer was Captain James A. Kirk. Kirk attracted some media attention when he was first named the captain, due to the similarity of his name to that of the Star Trek television character Captain James T. Kirk, played by William Shatner. Shatner wrote a letter of support to Zumwalt's crew in April 2014. On 7 December 2015, the ship departed Bath Iron Works for sea trials to allow the Navy and contractors to operate the vessel under rigorous conditions to determine whether Zumwalt is ready to join the fleet as an actively commissioned warship.

On 12 December 2015, during sea trials, Zumwalt responded to a US Coast Guard call for assistance for a fishing boat captain who was experiencing a medical emergency 40 nautical miles (74 km) from Portland, Maine. Due to deck conditions, the Coast Guard helicopter was unable to hoist the patient from the fishing boat, so the Zumwalt's crew used their 11-meter rigid-hulled inflatable boat (RHIB) to transfer him to the destroyer, from which he was transported to shore by the Coast Guard helicopter and then to a hospital. The US Navy accepted delivery of Zumwalt on 20 May 2016. In September 2016, it was reported that the vessel needed repairs after the detection of a seawater leak in the ship's auxiliary motor drive oil system. The US Navy commissioned Zumwalt on 15 October 2016, in Baltimore during Fleet Week.

On 21 November 2016, Zumwalt lost propulsion in her port shaft while passing through the Panama Canal from the Atlantic to the Pacific Ocean en route to her homeport in San Diego. Water had intruded in two of the four bearings that connect Zumwalt's port and starboard Advanced Induction Motors to its drive shafts. Both drive shafts failed and Zumwalt hit the lock walls in the canal, causing minor cosmetic damage. Zumwalt's passage through the Panama Canal had to be completed with tugboats. Zumwalt underwent repairs at Vasco Núñez de Balboa Naval Base near the Pacific end of the canal before continuing on to Naval Station San Diego. Upon the ship's arrival in San Diego, the leak was revealed to be through the lubrication cooling system, though the cause remains unknown.


Tills DE-748 - History

Elmo Russell Zumwalt, Jr., was born in San Francisco, California, on 29 November 1920. Graduating from the U.S. Naval Academy in June 1942, with the accelerated Class of '43, he served mainly in destroyers during World War II and continued in surface ship assignments after the war. In 1950, Lieutenant Commander Zumwalt received his first command, USS Tills (DE-748). Subsequent commands included USS Arnold J. Isbell (DD-869), in 1955-57, and USS Dewey (DLG-14), in 1959-61.

Promoted to the rank of Captain in July 1961, Zumwalt attended the National War College and held responsible headquarters positions in Washington, D.C., until receiving a further promotion in July 1965. Rear Admiral Zumwalt then commanded Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla Seven and served in the Office of the Chief of Naval Operations. He became Commander Naval Forces, Vietnam in September 1968 and was promoted to the rank of Vice Admiral shortly thereafter.

On 1 July 1970, Admiral Zumwalt received his fourth star and assumed the post of Chief of Naval Operations, the youngest officer to hold that position. During the next four years, he guided the Navy through a period of difficult personnel, fiscal, technological and operational challenges. Admiral Zumwalt retired from active duty in July 1974. He was thereafter active in political, policy and business pursuits until his death on 2 January 2000.

This page features selected views of Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr.

For more extensive biographical information on Admiral Zumwalt, see the Naval Historical Center's "Frequently Asked Questions" entry: Admiral Elmo Russell Zumwalt, Jr., USN

If you want higher resolution reproductions than the "Online Library's" digital images, see: "How to Obtain Photographic Reproductions."

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image .

Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., USN ,
Chief of Naval Operations

Portrait photograph, taken in August 1970 by PHC W. Mason.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

Online Image: 101KB 590 x 765 pixels

Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., USN ,
Chief of Naval Operations

Portrait photograph, taken in August 1970 by PHC W. Mason.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

Online Image: 68KB 594 x 765 pixels

Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., USN ,
Chief of Naval Operations

Speaks to the crew of USS Newman K. Perry (DD-883).
Photograph by PHC William M. Powers, released by the U.S. Naval War College Public Affairs Office, Newport, RI, 14 September 1970.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

Online Image: 114KB 590 x 765 pixels

Lieutenant Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., USN
(2nd from right),

Prize crew officer of the Japanese gunboat Ataka , and other U.S. Navy personnel question a Japanese Navy officer on the dock at Shanghai, China, in October 1945.
Ataka is tied up behind them.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

Online Image: 122KB 740 x 615 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system.

The Joint Chiefs of Staff

Photographed at the Pentagon, 4 January 1971.
They are, from left to right :
Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., Chief of Naval Operations
General William C. Westmoreland, Chief of Staff, U.S. Army
Admiral Thomas H. Moorer, USN, Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff
General John D. Ryan, Chief of Staff, U.S. Air Force and
General Leonard F. Chapman, Jr., Commandant, U.S. Marine Corps.
Photographed by Frank E. Hall.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

Online Image: 76KB 740 x 615 pixels

Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., USN ,
Chief of Naval Operations (center background)

Participates in a question and answer session with U.S. Navy Advisors at the Rach Soi Naval Base, Republic of Vietnam, in May 1971.
Photographed by PH1 H.P. Shiplett.
Note berets worn by Admiral Zumwalt and many of the others present.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

Online Image: 170KB 740 x 615 pixels

Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt. Jr., USN ,
Chief of Naval Operations (left), and
Rear Admiral Robert S. Salzer, USN ,
Commander Naval Forces Vietnam

Discuss their recent visit to Nam Can Naval Base, Republic of Vietnam, as the fly to their next stop, May 1971.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph.

Online Image: 107KB 740 x 515 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system as Photo # 428-N-1148801.

Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., USN ,
Chief of Naval Operations (seated, third from left)

Speaks with the Human Relations Council, at Fleet Activities, Yokosuka, Japan, 2 July 1971.
Photographed by PH2 Edward C. Mucma.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

Online Image: 137KB 740 x 615 pixels

This "Hi-Res" JPG image has been cleaned to mitigate dust and other significant imaging flaws. Details of the original painting are unchanged. Photo #: USN 1151747

John W. Warner , Secretary of the Navy,
Lieutenant Randall H. Cunningham,
Lieutenant (Junior Grade) William P. Driscoll, , and
Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt. Jr. , Chief of Naval Operations
(listed from left to right)

Meet in Mr. Warner's Pentagon Office, June 1972, in a ceremony honoring the two aviators, the Navy's only Vietnam War air "Aces".
Lt. Cunningham piloted F-4J "Phantom" jet fighters, with LtJG Driscoll as Radar Intercept Officer, when they shot down five enemy MiGs (four MiG-17s and one MiG-21) in January and May 1972. They were members of Fighter Squadron 96 (VF-96), based aboard USS Constellation (CVA-64).
In this photo, Cunningham and Driscoll are holding models of F-4 fighters.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph.

Online Image: 87KB 740 x 525 pixels

Reproductions of this image may also be available through the National Archives photographic reproduction system as Photo # 428-N-1151747.

Chief of Naval Operations change of command ceremonies

Senior attendees line up at the U.S. Naval Academy Superintendent's quarters, Annapolis, Maryland, during CNO change of command ceremonies held on 29 June 1974.
Those present are (from right to left) :
Admiral James L. Holloway, III, incoming CNO
Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, outgoing CNO
Admiral Thomas H. Moorer, Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff
Secretary of Defense James R. Schlesinger and
Vice Admiral William P. Mack, Naval Academy Superintendent.
Photographed by PHC B.M. Anderson.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

Online Image: 77KB 740 x 505 pixels

Current and past Chiefs of Naval Operations (CNO)

Gathered in the Pentagon Office of the Chief of Naval Operations for the unveiling of the CNO portraits, 26 June 1986.
Present are (from left to right):
Admiral James L. Holloway III, USN (Retired)
Admiral Carlisle A.H. Trost, USN, CNO Designate
Admiral Robert B. Carney, USN (Retired)
Admiral Thomas B. Hayward, USN (Retired)
Admiral James D. Watkins, USN, current CNO
Admiral George W. Anderson, USN (Retired), seated
Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., USN (Retired)
Admiral David L. McDonald, USN (Retired)
Admiral Arleigh A. Burke, USN (Retired) and
Admiral Thomas H. Moorer, USN (Retired).

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

Online Image: 118KB 740 x 550 pixels

Chiefs of Naval Operations

The current CNO, Admiral Frank Kelso, with former CNOs at the Pentagon, 19 October 1990.
Those present are (from left to right) :
Admiral Carlisle A.H. Trost, CNO in 1986-1990
Admiral Thomas Hayward, CNO in 1978-1982
Admiral Elmo Zumwalt, CNO in 1970-1974
Admiral Arleigh A. Burke, CNO in 1955-1961
Admiral Kelso
Admiral Thomas Moorer, CNO in 1967-1970
Admiral James Holloway, CNO in 1974-1978 and
Admiral James Watkins, CNO in 1982-1986.
Photographed by Dave Wilson.

Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

Online Image: 81KB 740 x 620 pixels

Related Image: See Photo # NH 104902 for a view of Admiral Thomas H. Moorer, USN, Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, speaking at the 29 June 1974 change of command ceremonies in which Admiral James L. Holloway, III, relieved Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., as Chief of Naval Operations.


End of war with Japan

As the war progressed to its conclusion in the Pacific, Tills commenced a needed availability at Guam. While in Apra Harbor, the destroyer escort received word that an atomic bomb had been dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, on 6 August. As Tills entered dry-dock ABSD-6 three days later for repairs to her sonar dome, a second atomic blast hit Nagasaki. While the destroyer escort was docked, in company with Torrance (AKA-76), Roberts (DE-749), and SS A. McKensie, airwaves brought the welcome news that Japan had surrendered on 15 August. The long Pacific war was over.

After remaining at Apra Harbor until 29 August, the destroyer escort headed for Saipan which she reached later that day. She remained there for almost a month. On 24 September, she was assigned to duty with Transport Squadron 12 at Buckner Bay, Okinawa.

Following her arrival at Nagasaki with transports bringing American occupation forces, Tills made two round trips between Nagasaki and Manila before making port at Saipan on 21 October, ending the initial leg of her homeward-bound voyage. Two days later, in company with three sister ships, the remainder of CortDiv 53. Tills weighed anchor, headed for Hawaii, and reached Pearl Harbor on 31 October.


Zumwalt, Elmo Russell Jr.

Introduction

Admiral Zumwalt Elmo Russell Jr. (* November 29, 1920/+ January 2, 2000) was an officer in the United States Navy.

As the nineteenth, he was appointed to the position [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/64953/] Commander of Naval Operations[/URL], which is the highest commander in the US Navy, and was the youngest officer in this capacity throughout the existence of the US Navy.

When he was in this position, he played a very important role in US military naval history, especially during the Vietnam War.

He was a war veteran who was honored many times and had a major impact on changing attitudes towards ordinary sailors. He sought to improve the lives of soldiers and also worked to address relationship issues related to racial and gender issues.

After leaving the US Army after 32 years of naval career, he unsuccessfully ran for the US Senate.

Part 1: Time of youth, time of education

Zumwalt was born in San Francisco, California. His parents, father Elmo Russell Zumwalt and mother Francis Zumwalt M.D., were village doctors. Francis was the daughter of a couple of French-speaking Canadian doctors from a small town in the state of Vermont. She was orphaned at an early age, her parents died during a smallpox epidemic. She was adopted by a family that moved to Los Angeles, where she then grew up. Adoptive parents supported her intention to follow in the footsteps of their deceased parents and also become a doctor.

In his youth, Zumwalt was an Eagle Scout (similar to our Scout) and received the Eagle Scouts of Merit from the American Scout Organization. He then graduated from Tulare Union High School in Tulare, California, where he was selected to give a final farewell speech.

He also graduated from Rutherford Preparatory School in Long Beach, California.

Part 2: The Road to the Navy

Originally, Elmo Russell had Zumwald Jr. intention to become a doctor, as were his parents. Despite this intention, he was admitted in 1939 to the United States Naval Academy (USNA) in Annapolis, Maryland.

As a naval cadet of the academy, he became president of the Trident Society, vice president of the Quarterback Society and twice won the "June Weekly Public Rhetoric" competition (1940 - 1941). Zumwalt took part in live debates with colleagues and was the company commander (1941) and the regiment commander (captain of the 3rd degree).

He graduated with honors and was promoted to the rank of lieutenant on June 19, 1942. He also received an Honorable Mention from the Texas Technical University.

Part 3: II. world war

Zumwalt became a member of the destroyer crew [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/20451/] USS Phelps (DD-360)[/URL]. In August 1943, the USS Phelps was transferred to the Pacific Training Command.

In January 1944, Zumwalt was transferred to a destroyer [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/65700/] USS Robinson (DD-562)[/URL] . During his service on this ship, Zumwalt was awarded the [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/175429/] Bronze Star with the emblem of bravery[/URL] for ". heroic analytical work in the combat information center . "in the fight with Japanese battleships October 25, 1944 in [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/newdesign/v900/clanek_12932.html] Battle of the Gulf of Leyte[/URL]. Among other things, the reasoning literally wrote: "During the torpedo attack on enemy battleships, Lieutenant Zumwalt provided the information necessary for a successful attack . ".

After the end of his participation in II. World War II In August 1945, Zumwalt continued to serve in the US Navy.

After the cessation of military operations in August 1945, he commanded (as an excellent officer of the crew of the USS Robinson) the Japanese river gunboat [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/87624/] HIMJS "Ataka"[/URL] with a displacement of 1,133 t, which was until 1933 in the formation of the 3rd US Fleet. It was the first time Zumwalt had been given command. During the operation of this ship, which ended on December 8, 1945, the Americans captured the ship Ataka, disarmed the Japanese crew and participated in the restoration of order. The ship was moving along the Wangpoo River towards Shanghai. There is also Elmo Russell Zumwalt Jr. he met his future wife Mouza Coutelais-du-Roche, whose father was a Frenchman and a Russian mother (it is possible that Zumwald was subconsciously drawn in the French direction in connection with his own parents, who were French-speaking Canadians). In Shanghai, the two young people were married and returned to the United States as married.

Part 4: Command functions

Another ship he served on was a destroyer [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/32677/] USS Soufley (DD-465)[/URL][/b:aaaaaa ], in March 1946 he was transferred to the destroyer [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/65878/] USS Zellars (DD-777)[/URL] as a senior officer and navigator.

In January 1948, he was sent to the reserve officer training corps at the University of North Carolina at Chappel Hill, where he served until June 1950.

In the same month he was appointed commander of the escort destroyer [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/66318/] USS Tills (DE-748)[/URL] which had backup status. This destroyer was built at the Charleston shipyards and was put into service on November 21, 1950.

Zumvalt commanded the USS Tills (DE-748) until March 1951, when he was transferred to the battleship [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/21899/] USS Wisconsin (BB- 64)[/URL] as a navigator.

"For merits in the service as a navigator on the USS Wisconsin during combat operations against enemy North Korea and the Chinese Communist Forces on the Korean battlefield from November 23, 1951 to March 30, 1952 . " the commander of the 7th Fleet gave a commendation letter with a ribbon and combat " IN". The commendation also states: "His navigational ability and tireless diligence in ensuring the safe navigation of the ship allowed the commanding officer to pay more attention to planning and operational firing. Adverse conditions and lack of visibility. He made a significant contribution to the planning of combat operations (. ) and directed the voyage of Wisconsin in the closest possible vicinity of the shore in positions that ensured the maximum effect of its own fire . "

He left the USS Wisconsin in June 1952 and enrolled at the Naval War Academy in Newport, Rhode Island.

He completed a one-year study in June 1953 and immediately reported to the Main Section of the Coastal and Naval Base, Office of Naval Human Resources, US Navy, Washington. He was also a recruiting officer and an officer in the medical care program for elderly officers and non-commissioned officers. He completed this work in July 1955.

After finishing work in the Office of Naval Personnel in July 1955, he took command of the destroyer [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/87598/] USS Arnold J. Isbell (DD-869)[/URL], with which he participated in actions in two deployments of the 7th US Fleet. In this capacity he was awarded a letter of commendation by the commander of the cruisers and destroyers of the US Pacific Fleet for the victory of his ship in the competition for the best ship and for the prizes it received - combat performance, technical maintenance, artillery, submarine combat and operability.

In July 1957, he returned to the Office of Naval Personnel, where he continued to perform military service.

In December 1957 he was transferred to the office of Assistant Secretary for the Navy (personnel and reserve forces), and served as Special Assistant for Naval Personnel until November 1958, then as Special Assistant and Naval Adjutant until August 1959.

In December 1959, Elmo Russell took over Zumwalt Jr. command of the first American missile frigate [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/77500/] USS Dewey (DLG-14)[/URL], built at Bath Iron Works Shipyards, Maine. This ship was put into service on December 7, 1959 and Zumwalt commanded it until June 1961.

During his command, the ship won a prize in the competition for the best ship in technical maintenance, supplies and armaments and was second in combat efficiency.

In June 1961, Zumwalt was transferred to Washington to study at the National War Academy. He studied here for one year between 1961-1962.

After graduating in June 1962, he was assigned to the office of Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Affairs in Washington, D.C., where he first served as officer in charge of France, Spain and Portugal and then as director of arms control and contingency planning for Cuba.

From December 1963 to July 21, 1965, he was executive assistant and senior aide to Paul H. Nitz, secretary of the Navy.

He was awarded the Meritorious Legion for the excellent performance of duties in the offices of the Ministry of Defense and the Secretary for the Navy.

Part 5: Fleet 7, Maritime Analysis and Vietnam

Elmo Russell Zumwalt Jr. he was promoted to the rank of Rear Admiral on July 1, 1965, and at the same time as his award for his work in the US Navy, he was assigned to command the 7th Fleet of Cruisers and Destroyers.

"For exceptionally meritorious work . " in this position he was awarded the Golden Star for the second [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/175432/] Meritorious Legion[/URL].

In August 1966 he was appointed Director of the Naval Operations Systems Analytical Group in Washington and ". for his extraordinary work . as Director of the Systems Analysis Department of the Office of the Commander of the Naval Operations for August 1966 to August 1968. naval analysis was awarded the [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/175432/] Medal of Merit[/URL] In the attached commendation letter, the award was justified as follows:
" Rear Admiral Zumwalt of the Naval Operations Command in charge of the Systems Analysis Division quickly developed the department into a highly efficient and responsive organization. Under his command, the department contributed to creating a better understanding of requirements, problems and solutions within the Navy. in important areas where they have had a strong influence on the development of combat capabilities of current and future US naval forces, demonstrating exceptional foresight, integrity, tact, and diplomacy as a personal agent of the Naval Operations Commander not only in the National Defense Department but also in congressional documents Among the most important analyzes completed under his direct control were the activities of the naval escort fleet in the fight against submarines, as well as analyzes of tactical aviation activities, ground-to-ground missiles and the "War at Sea" study. under reorganized by Rear Admiral Zumwald's leadership. The methodologies he established clearly and precisely defined the scope, objectives, manner, and conduct of the completed studies that led to the improvement of the U.S. Navy.[/I:aaaaaa] "

In September 1968, he took over as commander of the US Naval Forces in Vietnam and became head of a group of US military advisers and aides in Vietnam.

October 1, 1968 was Elmo Russell Zumwalt Jr. promoted to the rank of Vice Admiral.

In this rank he became a naval military adviser to the general [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/87723/] Creighton Williams Abrams Jr.[/URL], commander of all US military forces in Vietnam in 1968 - 1972 (from 1972 to 1974 he was Chief of Staff of the US Army. He always proudly reported to General Creight Abrams and said about to him that he was the most caring officer of all he had ever known.

In Vietnam, the Zumwalt did not command bundles of "deep-sea" ships (such as the 7th Fleet), but a fleet of speedboats patrolling the shores, patrolling the bays and rivers of Vietnam.

Among the commanders of speedboats were, among others, his son Elmo Russek Zumwalt III. and future Senator John Forbes Kerry.

Zumwalt always had the protection of the people under his command in the first place from Viet Cong forces. Members of the Viet Cong hid in the Vietnamese jungles and set various traps for the Americans and the soldiers of the South Vietnamese army.

Defoliants are used to destroy the leaves of vegetation in the jungle (and not only in the jungle, simply defoliation in general), under the cover of which the members of the Viet Cong, was developed in the USA at that time and a completely new chemical called "[ URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/16273/] Agent orange[/URL] ".

At that time, no one, not even Vice Admiral Elmo Russell Zumwalt Jr., had any idea what side effects this chemical had on the human body. Dow Chemical Company, Monsanto Company and Valero Energy Corporation (Diamond Shamrock), which produced the chemical, have done their best to convince users and make sure that their product is completely safe for the people who handle it.

Vice Admiral Zumwalt wanted to use "[URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/16273/] Agent orange[/URL]" to protect his son and, of course, all other American soldiers from ". clear and real threat . "in the form of the Viet Cong and therefore issued an order to use it. However, he inadvertently exposed everyone to another no less serious danger, both in the form of cancer for those who came into personal contact with this substance, and in the form of degenerative defects in their offspring. Unfortunately, only the future has shown that "[URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/16273/] Agent orange[/URL]" is a highly carcinogenic substance that is negative for genetics. However, at a time when these negative effects were unknown, Zumwalt decided quickly, unequivocally, and to the best of his knowledge and belief, to protect his people.

Elmo Russell Zumwalt III died as a result of "[URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/16273/] Agent orange[/URL]". in 1988 at the age of 42 and his son (Vice Admiral's grandson) was born with birth defects.

Elmo Russell Zumwalt III. in 1968 he said: "[also:aaaaaa] I am a lawyer and I do not know if I have reason to judge that he is" [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/16273/] Agent orange[/URL] "According to the latest scientific research, it is the cause of all my health problems - problems with the nervous system and skin cancer. But I am convinced of that.[/I:aaaaaa]"

The US Navy was commanded in Vietnam by Vice Admiral Elmo Russell Zumwalt Jr. until 15 May 1970.

Part 6: Naval Operations Commander

President of the USA [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/15042/] Richard M. Nixon[/URL] On April 14, 1970, he nominated Vice Admiral Zumwalt as a candidate for the post of [URL = https: // www. valka.cz/topic/view/64953/]Velitel Navitime Operations[/URL]. For this reason, on May 15, 1970, he was removed from the post of commander of the US Naval Forces in Vietnam. On this occasion, he was awarded the second Gold Star for the [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/175432/] Medal of Merit[/URL] for his excellent work in this position.

July 1, 1970 took office [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/64953/] Commander of Naval Operations[/URL] and on the same day was i promoted to the rank of [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/41002/] Admiral[/URL]. Immediately after taking office, as its first decision of a fundamental nature, a set of measures to combat discrimination on racial and sexual grounds. These measures were consistently applied in all components of the US Navy and were known as "Z-grams" among sailors. The measures also included orders to wear a beard, long hair and shaved head. The installation of beer dispensers was allowed in the barracks.
Not all of Zumwalt's orders and measures were positively received by the older sailors.In particular, measures against discrimination against women and people of color were fundamentally rejected by those who benefited from it until the arrival of Zumwald.

Admiral Elmo Russell Zumwalt launched a plan called "High-Low" (= High-Low), which consisted in the purchase and use of a large number of military ships from II. World War II, both in the construction of cheap ships. Using the "High-Low" plan, which was implemented despite the resistance of the Admiral [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/36552/] Hyman G. Rickover[/URL] and other high-ranking officers, Zumwalt managed to strike a balance between buying very expensive nuclear-powered ships and cheap ships for naval patrols, which were needed in large quantities. As the future "father of the US nuclear fleet," Rickover preferred to buy several large ships over the purchase of ordinary ships.

During Zumvalt's command of the Naval Operations, four new classes of ships were introduced into the Navy's arsenal, three of which fully reflected the "High-Low" plan:
- missile fast attack patrol boat class [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/41533/] Pegasus[/URL] - it was planned to produce more than 100 ships of this class, but only six were produced.
- missile reconnaissance frigate class [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/54554/] Oliver Hazzard Perry[/URL] - except the USA, they were produced in Australia (as Adelaide class), Spain (as Santa class Maria) and in Taiwan (as Cheng Kung Avenue). It was the most popular class of ships since the II. World War II to introduce into the arsenal of Arleigh Burk class destroyers.
- class destroyer [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/77806/] Arleigh Burke[/URL].
- SCS (Sea Control Ship) - this project was suspended after the departure of Elmo R. Zumwald in 1974 and has not yet been completed. Spain took over some elements and ideas and designed its light aircraft carrier "Príncipe de Asturias".

From the position [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/64953/] The Commander of Naval Operations[/URL] was released on June 29, 1974, ended his active service on July 1, 1974 and left for reserve.

Part 7: In civilian life

In 1976, Elmo Russell Zumwalt Jr. ran as a Democratic candidate for the state of Virginia to the US Senate. He failed in this area and was therefore not elected.

In his life, Zumwalt once again had contact with the Naval Operations Command, albeit indirectly and very sadly.

On May 16, 1996, Admiral [URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/87749/] Jeremy M. Boord[/URL] committed suicide (shot himself) at the time due to the controversy of Colonel David. Hackworth, published in News Week, whether he rightly uses the combat "V" for service in Vietnam for his Navy Commendation Medal and Navy Achievement Medal.

Retired Admiral Elmo Russell Zumwalt Jr. , as his then superior in Vietnam, publicly stated unequivocally that Boorda has the full right to use combat "V" for his service in Vietnam. Unfortunately, this statement of Zumwald did not reach Boord in time, he could not withstand the psychological onslaught and pulled the trigger .

Part 8: Family

At his old age, but practically from the end of active service in 1974, Elmo Russell Zumwalt Jr. settled in Arlington, Virginia.

He and his wife Mouza Coutelais du Roche (born in Harbin, Manchuria, now the People's Republic of China, father was French, mother of Russia) had four children together, two sons and two daughters.

The first son was named Elmo Russell Zumwalt III. and died in 1988 at the age of 42 of cancer when he came into contact with a defoliant during his service in Vietnam "[URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/16273/] Agent orange[/URL]" .
The second son is named James Gregory Zumwalt.
The daughters are named Ann F. Zumwalt-Coppola and Mouza C. Zumwalt-Weathers.

In the early 1980s, at the time of the eldest son's serious illness, Elmo Russell Zumwalt lobbied very intensively in the US Congress to establish a National Bone Marrow Donor Registry to help people in need of bone marrow and whose families did not have a suitable donor.

At the same time, the seriously ill son Elmo Russell Zumwalt III.he did not need a foreign donor because he could easily get a bone marrow transplant from his own sister. However, many other seriously ill people, like him, did not have the opportunity to get bone marrow from relatives, so his father wanted to help these people with the Register of Bone Marrow Donors and give them a chance if not for a complete cure, then at least to prolong life.

Indeed, his immense efforts in this area eventually led to the establishment of the "National Bone Marrow Donor Program" (NMDP) in June 1986. Reserve Admiral Elmo Russell Zumwalt Jr. he then became the first chairman of the board of directors of this program.

Zumwalt said he suspected the cause of his son's cancer in "[URL = https: //www.valka.cz/topic/view/16273/] Agent orange[/URL]". He also mentioned that his grandson Russell suffered from a congenital physical defect also due to this chemical.

Despite these negative facts, which were immediately noted by his closest, he said that he did not regret in the slightest the issuance of the order to use the "Orange agent", because he believes that although some people became seriously ill and died because of the substance, the number of people saved by destroying the enemy's camouflage is far higher.

In 1988, the son of Elmo Russell Zumwalt III died at the "Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center" in Seattle. The illness was simply stronger and he could not overcome it, and it was a great loss for his father. Before his death, he said that he did not feel angry with his father or blame him. After undergoing many treatments in several hospitals, he went to the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, where he had a bone marrow transplant donated by his sister Mouza.

Part 9: Last goodbye

Admiral Elmo Russell Zumwalt Jr. took place on January 2, 2000 at the "Duke University Medical Center" in Durham, North Carolina.

The cause of his death was "mesothelioma", a relatively rare type of lung cancer caused by asbestos, which was commonly used on ships as thermal insulation on ships while Zumwalt was serving them.

In addition to the aforementioned wife Mouza and three living children James Gregory, Ann and Mouza, he had 6 grandchildren.

Appendix A: Books

Elmo Russell Zumwalt Jr. participated in the writing of two books.

He wrote the first book himself and was called "On Watch: A Memmoir". Published by Quadrangle/New York Times Book Co. in New York in 1976. In this book, Zumwalt recalls his career with the US Navy and devotes much space to his realized "High-Low" plan.

A total of three people worked on the second book, "My Father, My Son": Elmo Russell Zumwalt Jr., his son Elmo Russell Zumwalt III. and writer John Pekkanen. The book was published by Macmilan in New York in 1986. Here, most of the space is devoted to the son's struggle with an insidious disease - cancer.

In 1988, according to the book "My Father, My son", a television film of the same name was made, in which the role of father was played by the actor Karl Malden and the role of son Keith Carradine. This film son of Elmo Russell Zumwalt III. unfortunately, he did not see it, because he died before its introduction.

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Zumwalt Elmo Russell Jr., admirál - Přehledy

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Studium:
Study:
Zumwalt Elmo Russell Jr.
Rok / YearŠkola, univerzitaSchool, university
1939Střední škola Valedictorian of Tulare, Tulare, KalifornieValedictorian of Tulare High School, Tulare, California
1939Rutherfordova přípravná škola, Long Beach, KalifornieRutherford Preparatory School, Long Beach, California
1942U.S. Námořní akademie, Annapolis, MarylandU.S. Naval Academy, Annapolis, Maryland
1953Námořní válečná univerzita, Newport, Rhode IslandNaval War College, Newport, Rhode Island
1962Národní válečná univerzita, Washington, D.C.National War College, Washington, D.C.
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Zumwalt Elmo Russell Jr.Životní milníkyOther Highlights
1Eagle Scout.Eagle Scout.
2Velel na prvním raketovém torpédoborci USA USS Dewey (DLG-14).Served as Commanding Officer of the first ship built from the keel up as a guided-missile ship USS Dewey (DLG-14).
3Byl vyhodnocen jako nejlepší důstojník posádky a za odměnu byl pověřen velením na japoské říční dělové lodi HIMJS "Ataka", zajaté v ústí řeky Jang-ce na sklonku II.světové války.Was prize crew officer of captured Japanese gunboat HIMJS "Ataka", captured at mouth of Yangtze River near end of WW II.
4Ve 44 letech se stal nejmladším kontradmirálem v dějinách Vojenského námořnictva USA.At age 44, the youngest naval officer ever promoted to Rear Admiral.
5 Ve 49 letech se stal nejmladším čtyřhvězdičkovým admirálem v historii Vojenského námořnictva USA a současně i nejmladším Velitel Námořních operací.At age 49, the youngest four-star Admiral in U. S. naval history, and the youngest to serve as Chief of Naval Operations.
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Hodnostní postup:
Rank progress:
Zumwalt Elmo Russell Jr.
Datum / DateVojenská hodnostMilitary rank
07.01.1939-19.06.1942praporčíkmidshipman
19.06.1942-01.05.1943podporučíkensign
01.05.1943-01.07.1944poručíklieutenant (junior grade)
01.07.1944-01.04.1950nadporučíklieutenant
01.04.1950-01.02.1955korvetní kapitánlieutenant commander
01.02.1955-01.07.1961fregatní kapitáncommander
01.07.1961-01.07.1965námořní kapitáncaptain
01.07.1965-01.10.1968kontradmirálrear admiral
01.10.1968-01.07.1970viceadmirálvice admiral
01.07.1970-01.07.1974admiráladmiral
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Služební postup:
Appoinments progress:
Zumwalt Elmo Russell Jr.
Datum / DateFunkceAppoinments
XX.06.1942-XX.08.1943USS Phelps (DD-360)USS Phelps (DD-360)
XX.01.1944-XX.10.1945USS Robinson (DD-562)USS Robinson (DD-562)
08.12.1945-XX.03.1946USS Soufley (DD-465)USS Soufley (DD-465)
XX.03.1946-XX.01.1948USS Zellars (DD-777)USS Zellars (DD-777)
XX.01.1948-XX.06.1950NROTC Unit, Universita Severní Karolíny v Chapel Hill, NC (asistent profesora pro námořní vědu) NROTC Unit, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, NC (Asst. Professor of Naval Science)
XX.06.1950-XX.03.1951USS Tills (DE-748) (velící důstojník)USS Tills (DE-748) (Commanding Officer)
XX.03.1951-XX.06.1952USS Wisconsin (BB-64) (navigátor) USS Wisconsin (BB-64) (Navigator)
XX.06.1952-XX.06.1953Námořní válečná univezita, Newport, RI (student) Naval War College, Newport, RI (student)
XX.06.1953-XX.07.1955Kancelář pro námořní personál, Washington Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington
XX.07.1955-XX.07.1957USS Arnold J. Isbell (DD-869) (velící důstojník) USS Arnold J. Isbell (DD-869) (Commanding Officer)
XX.07.1957-XX.12.1957 Kancelář pro námořní personál, Washington Bureau of Naval Personnel, Washington (Lieutenant Officer)
XX.12.1957-XX.11.1958Kancelář asistenta tajemníka pro námořnictvo pro kádrové i záložní síly (zvláštní asistant pro námořní personál)Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Personnel and Reserve Forces (Special Assistant for Naval Personnel)
XX.11.1958-XX.08.1959Kancelář asistenta tajemníka pro námořnictvo pro kádrové i záložní síly (asistent pro zvláštní zvláštní úloly a námořní pobočník)Office of the Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Personnel and Reserve Forces (Special Assistant and Naval Aide)
XX.12.1959-XX.06.1961USS Dewey (DLG-14) (velící důstojník)USS Dewey (DLG-14) (Commanding Officer)
XX.08.1961-XX.01.1962Národní válečná univerzita, Washington (student) National War College, Washington (student)
XX.06.1962-XX.12.1963Kancelář tajemníka ministra obrany pro ISA (důstojník přijímací kanceláře) Office of the Assistant Secretary of Defense for ISA (Desk Officer)
XX.12.1963-21.07.1965 Kancelář sekretáře pro Vojenské námořnictvo (výkonný asistent a starší pobočník) Office of the Secretary of the Navy (Executive Assistant and Senior Aide)
21.07.1965-XX.07.1966Velitel 7.flotily USA Commander, Cruiser-Destroyer Flotilla SEVEN
XX.08.1966-XX.08.1968Kancelář Velení Námořních operací (ředitel oddělení systémové analýzy) Office of the Chief of Naval Operations (Director, Systems Analysis Division)
30.09.1968-15.05.1970Velitel námořnictva USA ve Vietnamu, námořní poradní skupina, Vietnam Commander, U.S. Naval Forces, Vietnam and Chief, Naval Advisory Group, Vietnam
01.07.1970-29.06.1974Velitel Námořních operacíChief of Naval Operations

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Zumwalt Elmo Russell Jr., admirál - Vyznamenání

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Civilní vyznamenání USA:
US civil decorations:
Zumwalt Elmo Russell Jr.
Stužka / RibbonNázevName
Medaile Svobody (nejvyšší US civilní vyznamenání)Medal of Freedom (the U.S.’s highest civilian award)
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Vojenská vyznamenání USA:
US military decorations:
Zumwalt Elmo Russell Jr.
Stužka / RibbonNázevName
Medaile Za zásluhy se dvěma zlatými hvězdami místo druhé a třetí medaileNavy Distinguished Service Medal with two gold award stars in lieu of second and third award
Záslužná legie s jednou zlatou hvězdou Legion of Merit with one gold award star
Bronzová hvězda s bojovým "V"Bronze Star with Combat "V"
Námořní medaile Za zásluhy s bojovým "V" Navy Commendation Medal with Combat "V"
Prezidentská pochvala pro námořní jednotkuPresidential Unit Citation (Navy & Marine Corps)
Pochvala pro námořní jednotkuNavy Unit Commendation
Medaile Za službu v Číně China Service Medal
Medaile Za službu v amerických obranných silách s bronzovým písmenem "A"American Defense Service Medal with Bronze Letter "A"
Americká medaile Za kampaňAmerican Campaign Medal
Námořní medaile Za službu při okupaci Navy Occupation Service Medal
Národní medaile Za službu v obranných silách s jednou bronzovou hvězdouNational Defense Service Medal with one bronze star
Medaile za službu v Koreji se dvěma bronzovými hvězdami Korean Service Medal with two bronze stars
Medaile Za vítězství ve II.světové válceWorld War II Victory Medal

4x , 1x , 2x
Medaile za službu ve Vietnamu se sedmi hvězdami (4 zlaté, 1 stříbrná, 2 bronzové) místo dalších sedmi medailíVietnam Service Medal with seven stars (4 Gold, 1 Silver, 2 Bronze) in lieu of seven awards

4x , 1x , 2x
Medaile za asijsko-pacifickou kampaň se sedmi hvězdami (4 zlaté, 1 stříbrná, 2 bronzové)Asiatic-Pacific Campaign Medal with seven stars (4 Gold, 1 Silver, 2 Bronze)
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Zahraniční vyznamenání:
Foreign decorations:
Zumwalt Elmo Russell Jr.
Stát, stužka - State, ribbonNázevName
- Organizace spojených národů Medaile sil OSN za kampaň v Koreji United Nations United Nations Korean Medal
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Republika Argentina
Květnový řád za zásluhy o námořnictvo, Velkokříž (Orden de Mayo al Mérito Naval)
Argentine Republic
The Order of May for Naval Merit, Grand Master
- Belgické království
Řád Leopolda, Komandér řádu
Kingdome of Belgium
Order of Léopold, Commander
- Bolivijský Mnohonárodnostní Stát
Řád Za zásluhy o námořnictvo, stupeň pro vysoké důstojníky
Plurinational State of Bolivia
Order of Naval Merit, Grade of High Officer
- Brazilská federativní republika
Řád Za zásluhy o námořnictvo, medaile pro Velkodůstojník
Federative Republic of Brazil
Order of Naval Merit, Medal of Grand Officer
- Brazilská federativní republika
Národní řád Jižního kříže, stupeň Velký kříž
Federative Republic of Brazil
National Order of the Southern Cross, Degree of Grand Cross
- Chilská republika
Velká hvězda Za zásluhy o armádu
Republic of Chile
Great Star of Military Merit
- Kolumbijská republika
Řád admirála Padilly Za zásluhy o námořnictvo, Great Official
Republic of Colombia
Almirante Padilla Naval Merit Order, Great Official
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Dominikánská republika
Řád Za zásluhy Duarta, Sancheze a Melly, Velkokříž
Dominican Republic
Order of Merit of Duarte, Sanchez and Mella, Grand Cross with Silver Breast Star
- Francouzská republika
Řád čestné legie s hodností komandér
French Republic
Légion d’honneur in the Rank of Commander
- Spolková republika Něnecko
Velký kříž druhé třídy Řádu Za zásluhy
Federal Republic of Germany
Grand Cross, Second Class of the Order of Merit
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Řecká republika
Řád Jiřího I, Velkokříž
Hellenic Republic
Royal Order of George I, Grand Cross
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Indonésie
Bintang Jalasena Utama, první třída
Republic of Indonesia
Bintang Jalasena Utama, First Class
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Italská republika
Řád Za zásluhy Italské republiky 1.třídy, Velkokříž
Italian Republic
Order of Merit of the Italian Republic 1st Class, Knight Grand Cross
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Japonsko
Řád vycházejícího slunce první třídy, Velkokříž
Japan
Order of the Rising Sun, 1st Class, Grand Cordon
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Korejská republika
Řád Za zásluhy o armádu třetího stupně, Lord Chungmu Cordon
Republic of Korea
Order of Military Merit, Third Class, Lord High Admiral
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Korejská republika
Pochvala prezidenta Koreje
Republic of Korea
Korean Presidential Unit Citation
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Korejská republika
Řád Za zásluhy o národní bezpečnost, medaile Tong-il
Republic of Korea
Order of National Security Merit, Tong-Il Medal
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Nizozemsko
Řád Orange-Nassau (s meči), Velkodůstojník s meči
Kingdom of the Netherlands
Order of Orange-Nassau (with Swords), Grand Officer
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Norské království
Královský Norský řád Svatého Olava, Velkokříž
Kingdom of Norway
Royal Norwegian Order of St. Olav, Grand Cross
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Filipínská republika
Pochvala prezidenta Filipín
Republic of the Philippines
Philippine Presidential Unit Citation
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Filipínská republika
Medaile za osvobození Filipín se dvěma hvězdami
Republic of the Philippines
Philippine Liberation Medal with two service stars
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Švédské království
Švédský královský řád meče, Rytířský velkokříž
Kingdom of Sweden
Royal Swedish Order of the Sword, Knighthood Grand Cross
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Bolívarovská republika Venezuela
Řád Za zásluhy o námořnictvo první třídy
Bolivarian Republic of Venezuela
Order of Naval Merit, First Class
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Vietnamská republika
Národní řád Vietnamu třetí třídy
Republic of Vietnam
National Order of Vietnam, Third Class
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Vietnamská republika
Řád Za význačný přínos ve službě námořnictvu republiky Vietnam první třídy
Republic of Vietnam
Republic of Vietnam Navy Distinguished Service Order, First Class
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Vietnamská republika
Kříž Za statečnost s palmami republiky Vietnam
Republic of Vietnam
Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross with Palm
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Vietnamská republika
Kříž Za statečnost s palmami a pochvalou republiky Vietnam
Republic of Vietnam
Republic of Vietnam Gallantry Cross Unit Citation with Palm
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Vietnamská republika
Medaile Za kampaň repuliky Vietnam s označením "1960 Bar"
Republic of Vietnam
Republic of Vietnam Campaign Medal with "1960 Bar" device
-
Vietnamská republika
Medaile za civilní aktivitu první třídy
Republic of Vietnam
Civil Actions Medal, First Class

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Poručík Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr. (druhý zprava)

Za odměnu byl poručík Zumwalt pověřen velením na zajaté japonské říční dělové lodi HIMJS "Ataka". Americká posádka klade otázky japonskému námořnímu důstojníkovi v přístavu Šanghaj, Čína, říjen 1945.

Říční dělová loď HIMJS "Ataka" je uvázána u mola za nimi.

Lieutenant Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr. (2nd from right)

Prize crew officer of the Japanese gunboat Ataka, and other U.S. Navy personnel question a Japanese Navy officer on the dock at Shanghai, China, in October 1945.
Ataka is tied up behind them.


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Official U.S. Navy Photograph, now in the collections of the National Archives.

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Admirál Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., Velitel Námořních operací

Admirál Zumwalt promlouvá k posádce USS Newman K. Perry (DD-883) v Newportu 14.září 1970, stát Rhode Island.

Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., Chief of Naval Operations

Speaks to the crew of USS Newman K. Perry (DD-883), Newport, Rhode Island, 14 September 1970.


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Photograph by PHC William M. Powers, released by the U.S. Naval War College Public Affairs Office.
Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

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Sbor náčelníků štábů (Generální štáb)

Fotografie byla pořízena v budově Pentagonu 4. ledna 1971.

Zleva doprava:
Admirál Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., Velitel Námořních operací
General William C. Westmoreland, Náčelník generálního štábu armády USA
Admiral Thomas H. Moorer, Náčelník štábu vojenského námořnictva USA
General John D. Ryan, Náčelník štábu letectva USA
General Leonard F. Chapman, Jr., Velitel námořní pěchoty USA

The Joint Chiefs of Staff

Photographed at the Pentagon, 4 January 1971.
They are, from left to right:
Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., Chief of Naval Operations
General William C. Westmoreland, Chief of Staff, U.S. Army
Admiral Thomas H. Moorer, USN, Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff
General John D. Ryan, Chief of Staff, U.S. Air Force and
General Leonard F. Chapman, Jr., Commandant, U.S. Marine Corps.


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Photographed by Frank E. Hall.
Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

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Admirál Elmo R. Zumwalt. Jr., Velitel Námořních operací (vlevo) a kontradmirál Robert S. Salzer, Velitel námořních sil USA ve Vietnamu.

Diskutují o aktuální situaci na palubě letadla během Zumwaltovy návštěvy námořní základny Nam Can během mezipřistání, květen 1971

Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt. Jr., USN, Chief of Naval Operations (left), and Rear Admiral Robert S. Salzer, USN, Commander Naval Forces Vietnam

Discuss their recent visit to Nam Can Naval Base, Republic of Vietnam, as the fly to their next stop, May 1971.

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Admirál Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., Velitel Námořních operací (uprostřed vzadu)

Admirál Zumwalt na mítinku s americkými vojáky na námořní základně Rach Soi ve Vietnamu, květen 1971.

Všimněte si, že má stejný baret jako obyčejní námořníci a že ho má dokonce i stejně opotřebovaný, což svědčí o tom, že jej běžně používal.

Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., USN, Chief of Naval Operations (center background)

Participates in a question and answer session with U.S. Navy Advisors at the Rach Soi Naval Base, Republic of Vietnam, in May 1971.

Note berets worn by Admiral Zumwalt and many of the others present.


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Photographed by PH1 H.P. Shiplett.
Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

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Admirál Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., Velitel Námořních operací (sedí u stolu třetí zleva)

Admirál Elmo R. Zumwalt rozmlouvá s "Human Relations Council" (Zástupců pro mezilidské vztahy), Yokosuka, Japonsko, 2.července 1971.

Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr., USN,
Chief of Naval Operations (seated, third from left)

Speaks with the Human Relations Council, at Fleet Activities, Yokosuka, Japan, 2 July 1971.


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Photographed by PH2 Edward C. Mucma.
Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

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John W. Warner, Ministr námořnictva, poručík Randall H. Cunningham, podporučík William P. Driscoll a admirál Elmo R. Zumwalt. Jr., Velitel Námořních operací (zleva doprava)

Setkání ve Wernerově kanceláři v Pentagonu, červen 1972.
Toto setkání proběhlo bezprostředně poté, co byli oba letci námořního letectva z války ve Vietnamu vyznamenáni a navíc dostali titul "Letecké eso".
Poručík Cunningham byl pilotem F-4J "Phantom", podporučík Driscoll byloperátorem radiolokátoru a zbraňových systémů.
Sestřelili od ledna do května celkem pět MiGů (čtyři MiG-17 a jeden MiG-21).
Oba byli příslušníky 96. stíhací eskadry (VF-96), která měla základnu na letadlové lodi USS Constellation (CVA-64).

Všimněte si, že na této fotografii drží Cunningham i Driscoll v ruce model stíhačky F-4.

John W. Warner, Secretary of the Navy, Lieutenant Randall H. Cunningham, Lieutenant (Junior Grade) William P. Driscoll, and Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt. Jr., Chief of Naval Operations (listed from left to right)

Meet in Mr. Warner′s Pentagon Office, June 1972, in a ceremony honoring the two aviators, the Navy′s only Vietnam War air "Aces".
Lt. Cunningham piloted F-4J "Phantom" jet fighters, with LtJG Driscoll as Radar Intercept Officer, when they shot down five enemy MiGs (four MiG-17s and one MiG-21) in January and May 1972. They were members of Fighter Squadron 96 (VF-96), based aboard USS Constellation (CVA-64).

In this photo, Cunningham and Driscoll are holding models of F-4 fighters.

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Arlington, stát Virginia, 10. ledna 1973

Ministr obrany Melvin R. Laird v rozhovoru s nejvyššími veliteli a náčelníky ve své kanceláři v Pentagonu.

Mítinku se zúčastnili (zleva doprava):
admirál Thomas H. Moorer, předseda
generál Creighton W. Abrams, Náčelník generálního štábu armády USA
admirál Elmo R. Zumwalt JR., Velitel Námořních operací
generál Robert E. Cushman Jr., Velitel námořní pěchoty
generál John D. Ryan, Náčelník štábu letectva USA

Arlington, Virginia, 10 Jan 1973

Secretary of Defense Melvin R. Laird meets with the Joint Chiefs of Staff in his Pentagon office.

Attending the meeting are, left to right: Adm. Thomas H. Moorer, chairman
Gen. Creighton W. Abrams, chief of staff, U.S. Army
Adm. Elmo R. Zumwalt JR., chief of naval operations
Gen. Robert E. Cushman Jr., commandant, U.S. Marine Corps and
Gen. John D. Ryan, chief of staff, U.S. Air Force.


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Camera Operator: PHC Davis Wilson

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Slavnostní ceremoniál předání funkce Velitel Námořních operací

Osobnosti seřazené na půdě US Námořní akademie v Annapolisu, stát Maryland, během slavnostního ceremoniálu při předání funkce Velitel Námořních operací 29.června 1974.

Zprava doleva jsou:
Admiral James L. Holloway III., nastupující Velitel Námořních operací
Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, odcházející Velitel Námořních operací
Admiral Thomas H. Moorer, Náčelník generálního štábu USA
Ministr obrany USA James R. Schlesinger
viceadmiral William P. Mack, ředitel Námořní akademie.

Chief of Naval Operations change of command ceremonies

Senior attendees line up at the U.S. Naval Academy Superintendent′s quarters, Annapolis, Maryland, during CNO change of command ceremonies held on 29 June 1974.

Those present are (from right to left):
Admiral James L. Holloway, III, incoming CNO
Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, outgoing CNO
Admiral Thomas H. Moorer, Chairman, Joint Chiefs of Staff
Secretary of Defense James R. Schlesinger and
Vice Admiral William P. Mack, Naval Academy Superintendent.


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Photographed by PHC B.M. Anderson.
Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval History and Heritage Command.

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Fotografie Elmo Russella Zumwalta Jr. při rozhovoru s Harry Kreislerem 14. března 1989.

Záznam celého pořadu, který se jmenuje "Conversations with History - Elmo Russell Zumwalt Jr." a je pro Californskou universitu v Berkeley, je zde: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e-2bwLiX_DY

In this 1989 interview, Conversations host Harry Kreisler welcomes Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt for a discussion of his life and times as one of America′s most distinguished military officers.


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Zdroj informace:
Institute of International Studies, UC Berkeley - globetrotter.berkeley.edu

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Prezident Clinton salutuje Elmo R. Zumwaltovi při předávání nejvyššího amerického civilního vyznamenání Medaile Svobody v lednu 1998.

President Clinton saluted Zumwalt with the Presidential Medal of Freedom in January 1998.

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Cover Sheet from Book "On Watch"

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Obálka knihy "Můj otec, můj syn".

Cover Sheet from Book "My Father, My Son".

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Portrét admirála Elmo R. Zumwalta Jr. od Toma Nielsena.

Obraz je olejomalba rozměru 106,7 x 76,2 cm a je v blíže neupřesněné soukromé sbírce.

Admiral Elmo R. Zumwalt, Jr.

Traditional Oil on Canvas.
Size: 42 by 30 inches
Private Collection

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Zumwalt, Elmo Russell Jr., admirál - Civilní aktivity

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Hostující profesor:
Visiting Professor:
Období
Period
Téma
Theme
Univerzita Vanderbilt
Vanderbilt University
1974-1975Obor politických věd, Fakulta pro postgraduální studium managementu
Department of Political Science, Graduate School of Management
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Hostující přednášející:
Guest Lecturer:
Období
Period
Téma
Theme
Pennsylvánská universita
University of Pennsylvania
1974-1975Politika, Vědecký obor
Political, Science Department
Stanfordská univerzita
Stanford University
1974Fakulta pro postgraduální studium managementu, Fakulta pro postgraduální studium žurnalistiky, Obor politických věd
Graduate School of Management, Graduate School of Journalism, Political Science Department)

Člen správních rad a vedení společností / Member of the Board of Directors:

Phelps-Stokes Fund
Esmark, Inc.
Presidential Classroom for Young Americans Organization Resources Counselors, Inc.
Basic Industries, Inc.

Organizace / Organizations:

Člen / Member: President′s Foreign Intelligence Advisory Board
Předseda / Chairman: Ethics and Public Policy Center
Zakladatel / Founder: Marrow Foundation
Ředitel / Director: National Marrow Donor Program
Ředitel / Director: Vietnam Assistance to the Handicapped Foundation
Served on the International Consortium for Research on the Health Effects of Radiation
Chairman, National Council of the Vietnam Center, Texas Tech University
Předseda / Chairman: Board of the U.S. Navy Memorial Foundation

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Zumwalt, Elmo Russell Jr., admirál - Z-grams


Toto je seznam tzv. Z-gramů (je o nich v textu zmínka), prozatím jenom anglicky. Budu se snažit o přeložení tohoto seznamu co nejdříve.
Admirál Zumwalt mně ale dal dost zabrat a tak si od něj musím malinko odpočinout.


Z-grams: A List of Policy Directives Issued by Admiral Zumwalt While in Office as Chief of Naval Operations, 1 July 1970 to 1 July 1974.

Note: A Z-gram is properly known as a Z-NavOp. Z-gram #1 became effective on 14 July 1970. All Z-grams were canceled in name only on the day Zumwalt left his post as Chief of Naval Operations (CNO). At that time, two Z-grams had previously been canceled and 87 had been or were being incorporated into the regular Navy directives system. The remaining 32 were informative in nature, announcing a one-time program or were statements of policy subsequently included throughout Navy personnel programs. Some of the Z-grams are on line.

1. Relieving Admiral Moorer (Zumwalt assumes duties as CNO)
2. Retention Study Groups
3. Cryptographic procedures and Policy
4. 30 days leave authorization for officers receiving Permanent Change of Station orders
5. Civilian clothes aboard ship for First Class Petty Officers on certain ships in Sixth and First fleets
6. Dependent Air Charter Program
7. Navy Sponsor Program
8. Officer Assignment
9. Meritorious advancement in rate of superior performing career Petty Officers
10. Services to crews of transient aircraft
11. Enlisted requests to remain on sea duty
12. Civilian clothing on shore establishments
13. Post-deployment leave policy
14. Collateral duties
15. Statement of earnings (to all Navy members)
16. Swaps (established a centralized and automated exchange of duty program at Bureau of Naval Personnel)
17. Personal check cashing ceilings (increased to $50 per person per day)
18. Navy Finance Center 24-hour service
19. Below-zone percentage limitation suspension (concerning % of officers who could be recommended for promotion)
20. Lockers and washing facilities (for personnel who had to work in dungarees ashore)
21. Compensatory time off
22. Improving shore establishment habitability
23. CPO [Chief Petty Officer] advisory board to CNO
24. Wives ombudsman https://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq93-24.htm
25. Forces afloat liberty policy
26. Shore patrol staffing and training
27. Forces afloat operating tempo
28. Retention study group progress report
29. Leave policy for deployed units
30. Commissioned officers open mess
31. TyCom [Type Command] ship handling competition
32. Reenlistment ceremonies
33. Navy exchange and commissary advisory boards
34. Uniform changes
35. BOQ/BEQ conveniences (encouraged installation of beer vending machines in Bachelor Officers Quarters and senior Bachelor Enlisted Quarters)
36. Standards of service
37. Aviation squadron command
38. Holiday routine at sea
39. Extended commissary hours
40. Cash/check option at payday
41. Command excellence forum
42. Junior officer request for sea duty
43. Disbursing claims processing
44. Quarterdeck watches
45. Assistance to POW/MIA [Prisoner of War/Missing in Action] families
46. Refinement of 3-M [Maintenance Material Management] system
47. Responsibility for inactivating ships
48. People programs
49. Medals and awards
50. Cold iron status (to encourage liberal leave and liberty following return of ships from extended assignments)
51. Small craft insignia (new breast insignia) www.history.navy.mil
52. Dissemination of CNO policy
53. Officer billet summary
54. CNO discussions with Navy personnel
55. Human Resource Management
56. Exchange duty for officers
57. Elimination of demeaning or abrasive regulations https://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq93-57.htm
58. Acceptance of checks in ships′ stores
59. Professional development program
60. Action Line telephone
61. Reassignment of CWO [Communication Watch Officer] and RPS [Registered Publication System] duties
62. CNO senior officer forum
63. ComTac publications aboard ship (reduction of operational publications on board ships, thus reducing administrative workload to make changes to them)
64. Ship conning indication
65. Vietnamization challenge
66. Equal opportunity https://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq93-66.htm
67. Command inspection program
68. Civilian clothes aboard ship https://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq93-68.htm
69. Command in the grade of captain
70. Grooming and uniform policy
71. Battle streamers for Navy flag
72. Quarterdeck watches
73. Enlisted Vietnam volunteers
74. Preferential housing considerations
75. Sea/shore rotation
76. Outstanding recruiter awards
77. Enlisted blue working uniform
78. Inspection scheduling policy
79. Augmentation into Regular Navy
80. MCPOs on E-8/E-9 selection boards
81. Regular Navy warrant officer program
82. Boards, committees and guidance programs
83. Motor vehicle transportation for forces afloat
84. Copies of fitness reports
85. Legislation status reports
86. CNO scholars program
87. Navy uniform
88. Advances of pay
89. SecNav/CNO fellowship program
90. Responsibility pay for senior Naval advisors in Vietnam
91. Limited duty officer program
92. Civilian clothing aboard ship for nonrated personnel
93. People programs
94. Navy drug exemption/rehabilitation program
95. Master CPO of the command
96. Retention study group schedule
97. ComRats for hospital patients
98. Advance information about new duty stations
99. Officer swords
100. Personnel exchange program
101. Six-day sales operation at designated Navy commissary stores
102. Responsibility for standards of smartness https://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq93-102.htm
103. Sailor of the Year award https://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq93-103.htm
104. Challenge of 1972
105. Navy drug exemption and rehabilitation program
106. Quarterdeck watch officers
107. CNO Sailor of the Year
108. Continuation beyond 30 years of active service
109. Recruiting
110. Human resources development
111. Southeast Asia build up
112. Collateral duties
113. Career counseling program
114. Ecology spot reports
115. Alcohol and alcoholism among Naval personnel
116. Equal rights and opportunities for women in the Navy https://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq93-116.htm
117. Good order and discipline https://www.history.navy.mil/faqs/faq93-117.htm
118. Sea/shore rotation
119. Minority affairs assistance
120. Revised master chief petty officer of the fleet/force/command program
121. CNO change of command remarks

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Vystoupení Russella D. Feingolda, senátora za stát Wisconsin v Senátu Spojených států Amerických ve Washingtonu na 106.zasedání, ve 2.sekci, pondělí 24.ledna 2000 na památku admirála Elmo R. Zumwalta Jr.


Tills DE-748 - History

This page provides the hull numbers of all U.S. Navy escort ships numbered in the DE series from 700 through 1107, with links to those ships with photos available in the Online Library.

See the list below to locate photographs of individual escort ships.

If the escort ship you want does not have an active link on this page, contact the Photographic Section concerning other research options.

Left Column --
Escort Ships numbered
DE-700 through DE-1030:

  • DE-700 : Currier (1944-1967)
  • DE-701 : Osmus (1944-1973)
  • DE-702 : Earl V. Johnson (1944-1968)
  • DE-703 : Holton (1944-1974)
  • DE-704 : Cronin (1944-1971), later DEC-704
  • DE-705 : Frybarger (1944-1973), later DEC-705

  • DE-739 : Bangust (1943-1952)
  • DE-740 : Waterman (1943-1952)
  • DE-741 : Weaver (1943-1952)
  • DE-742 : Hilbert (1944-1973)
  • DE-743 : Lamons (1944-1973)
  • DE-744 : Kyne (1944-1973)
  • DE-745 : Snyder (1944-1973)
  • DE-746 : Hemminger (1944-1959)
  • DE-747 : Bright (1944-1950)
  • DE-748 : Tills (1944-1969)
  • DE-749 : Roberts (1944-1971)

  • DE-763 : Cates (1943-1950)
  • DE-764 : Gandy (1944-1951)
  • DE-765 : Earl K. Olsen (1944-1973)
  • DE-766 : Slater (1944-1951)
  • DE-767 : Oswald (1944-1973)
  • DE-768 : Ebert (1944-1951)
  • DE-769 : Neal A. Scott (1944-1969)

  • DE-789 : Tatum (1943-1961), later APD-81
  • DE-790 : Borum (1943-1966)
  • DE-791 : Maloy (1943-1966)
  • DE-792 : Haines (1943-1961), later APD-84
  • DE-793 : Runels (1944-1961), later APD-85
  • DE-794 : Hollis (1944-1975), later APD-86 & LPR-86
  • DE-795 : Gunason (1944-1974)
  • DE-796 : Major (1944-1973)
  • DE-797 : Weeden (1944-1969)
  • DE-798 : Varian (1944-1974)
  • DE-799 : Scroggins (1944-1967)

  • DE-1021 : Courtney (1956-1974)
  • DE-1022 : Lester (1957-1973)
  • DE-1023 : Evans (1957-1974)
  • DE-1024 : Bridget (1957-1974)
  • DE-1025 : Bauer (1957-1974)
  • DE-1026 : Hooper (1958-1974)
  • DE-1027 : John Willis (1957-1973)
  • DE-1028 : Van Voorhis (1957-1973)
  • DE-1029 : Hartley (1957-1972)
  • DE-1030 : Joseph K. Taussig (1957-1973)

Right Column --
Escort Ships numbered
DE-1031 through DE-1107:

  • DE-1033 : Claud Jones (1959-1974)
  • DE-1034 : John R. Perry (1959-1973)
  • DE-1035 : Charles Berry (1959-1974)
  • DE-1036 : McMorris (1960-1974)

  • DE-1043 : Edward McDonnell (1965-1995), later FF-1043
  • DE-1044 : Brumby (1965-1989), later FF-1044
  • DE-1045 : Davidson (1964-1989), later FF-1045

  • DE-1047 : Voge (1966-1995), later FF-1047
  • DE-1048 : Sample (1968-1989), later FF-1048
  • DE-1049 : Koelsch (1967-1989), later FF-1049
  • DE-1050 : Albert David (1968-1989), later FF-1050
  • DE-1051 : O'Callahan (1968-1989), later FF-1051


Service history

Following shakedown training off San Diego, the destroyer tender departed the west coast to join the Atlantic Fleet at Charleston, S.C.. World War II had been over for several months when she arrived at her berth on the Wando River on 1 December. Arcadia served as tender to destroyers joining the inactive fleet at Charleston, and she also developed the official program for decommissioning and inactivation to be used by tenders of her own class. Arcadia was placed in commission, in reserve, on 7 February 1947 and served as accommodation vessel for Submarine Group 1 of the Charleston group, Atlantic Reserve Fleet. She was placed in full commission on 1 August 1951 and assigned a new home port, Newport, R.I., where she tended destroyers in the Narragansett Bay area.

The Wando River is a tidewater river in the coastal area of South Carolina. It begins in the town of Awendaw, Charleston County, and has its mouth at the Cooper River shortly before it flows into Charleston Harbor. The Wando's drainage area is 73,061 acres (295.67 km 2 ). Nearby Drum Island is uninhabited. It is spanned by the bridges crossing the Wando River and Towne creek.

The Naval Station Newport is a United States Navy base located in the city of Newport and the town of Middletown, Rhode Island. Naval Station Newport is home to the Naval War College and the Naval Justice School. It once was the homeport for Cruiser Destroyer Force Atlantic (COMCRUDESLANT), which relocated to Naval Station Norfolk in the early 1970s. Newport now maintains inactive ships at its pier facilities, along with the United States Coast Guard. In BRAC 2005, NAVSTA Newport gained over five hundred billets, in addition to receiving, again, the Officer Candidate School (OCS), the Naval Supply Corps School, and several other activities, to include a few Army Reserve units.

Narragansett Bay is a bay and estuary on the north side of Rhode Island Sound covering 147 mi 2 (380 km 2 ), 120.5 mi 2 (312 km 2 ) of which is in Rhode Island. The Bay forms New England's largest estuary, which functions as an expansive natural harbor and includes a small archipelago. Small parts of it extend into Massachusetts.

Arcadia supported the Atlantic Fleet with repair services until 1968 when she was decommissioned. She served as 6th Fleet destroyer tender during many deployments to the Mediterranean where she made working visits to such ports as Naples, Italy Cannes, France Valencia, Spain, Palma, and Barcelona, Spain Lisbon, Portugal Piraeus, Greece and Istanbul, Turkey. The tender visited the Caribbean while exercising in yearly "Springboard" operations in the 1950s and 1960s, calling at ports in the Dominican Republic, Puerto Rico, Jamaica, and the Virgin Islands. In October 1964 Arcadia steamed to Orange, Texas to strip five mothballed high-speed transports for parts needed by active duty destroyers. The six-week trip netted nearly $800,000 worth of parts and equipment for use by the ships of the Atlantic Fleet.

The Sixth Fleet is a numbered fleet of the United States Navy operating as part of United States Naval Forces Europe. The Sixth Fleet is headquartered at Naval Support Activity Naples, Italy. The officially stated mission of the Sixth Fleet in 2011 is that it "conducts the full range of Maritime Operations and Theater Security Cooperation missions, in concert with coalition, joint, interagency, and other parties, in order to advance security and stability in Europe and Africa." The current commander of the Sixth Fleet is Vice Admiral Lisa M. Franchetti.

Orange is a city in Orange County, Texas, United States. As of the 2010 census, the city population was 18,595. It is the county seat of Orange County, and is the easternmost city in Texas. Located on the Sabine River at the border with Louisiana, Orange is 113 miles (182 km) from Houston and is part of the Beaumont−Port Arthur Metropolitan Statistical Area. Founded in 1836, it is a deep-water port to the Gulf of Mexico.

Although she serviced destroyers primarily, Arcadia was called upon in November 1966 to repair the aircraft carrier USS   Saratoga. The tender departed Newport on 19 November for the cruise to Mayport, Florida where she remained until 13 December completing the repair work needed following a Mediterranean cruise. She returned to Newport and resumed her normal operations. In both 1966 and 1967, Arcadia made cruises to Key West and Naval Station Mayport to provide services to Destroyer Division 601, Destroyer Squadron 16, and reserve training destroyers from various ports in the Gulf of Mexico.

An aircraft carrier is a warship that serves as a seagoing airbase, equipped with a full-length flight deck and facilities for carrying, arming, deploying, and recovering aircraft. Typically, it is the capital ship of a fleet, as it allows a naval force to project air power worldwide without depending on local bases for staging aircraft operations. Carriers have evolved since their inception in the early twentieth century from wooden vessels used to deploy balloons to nuclear-powered warships that carry numerous fighters, strike aircraft, helicopters, and other types of aircraft. While heavier aircraft such as fixed-wing gunships and bombers have been launched from aircraft carriers, it is currently not possible to land them. By its diplomatic and tactical power, its mobility, its autonomy and the variety of its means, the aircraft carrier is often the centerpiece of modern combat fleets. Tactically or even strategically, it replaced the battleship in the role of flagship of a fleet. One of its great advantages is that, by sailing in international waters, it does not interfere with any territorial sovereignty and thus obviates the need for overflight authorizations from third party countries, reduce the times and transit distances of aircraft and therefore significantly increase the time of availability on the combat zone.

USS Saratoga (CV/CVA/CVB-60), was the second of four Forrestal-class supercarriers built for the United States Navy in the 1950s. Saratoga was the sixth U.S. Navy ship, and the second aircraft carrier, to be named for the Battles of Saratoga in the American Revolutionary War.

Naval Station Mayport is a major United States Navy base in Jacksonville, Florida. It contains a protected harbor that can accommodate aircraft carrier-size vessels, ship's intermediate maintenance activity (SIMA) and a military airfield with one asphalt paved runway (5/23) measuring 8,001 ft ×𧇈 ft.

Arcadia was decommissioned on 28 June 1968, berthed in the National Defense Reserve Fleet contingent in the James River on 15 November, and formally transferred to the Maritime Administration on 30 June 1969. Her name was struck from the Naval Vessel Register on 1 July 1973, and she was sold to Levin Metals of San Jose, California on 1 August 1974 and scrapped in San Pedro, California.

The National Defense Reserve Fleet (NDRF) consists of "mothballed" ships, mostly merchant vessels, that can be activated within 20 to 120 days to provide shipping for the United States of America during national emergencies, either military or non-military, such as commercial shipping crises.

The Naval Vessel Register (NVR) is the official inventory of ships and service craft in custody of or titled by the United States Navy. It contains information on ships and service craft that make up the official inventory of the Navy from the time a vessel is authorized through its life cycle and disposal. It also includes ships that have been removed from the register, but not disposed of by sale, transfer to another government, or other means. Ships and service craft disposed of prior to 1987 are currently not included, but are gradually being added along with other updates.


Contents

The class was also known as the DET type from their diesel electric tandem drives. [1] The DET's substitution for a turboelectric propulsion plant was the primary difference with the predecessor Buckley ("TE") class. [2] The DET was, in turn, replaced with a direct-drive diesel plant to yield the design of the successor Edsall ("FMR") class. [3]

A total of 72 ships of the Cannon class were built.

  • DE-99 through DE-113 (six are French)
  • DE-162 through DE-197
  • DE-739 through DE-750
  • DE-763 through DE-771

During World War II, six ships of the class were earmarked for the Free French Naval Forces and a further eight were transferred the Brazilian Navy.

Free French ships Edit

    as Sénégalais as Algérien as Tunisien as Marocain as Hova as Somali

Transferred to Brazil Edit

    as Babitonga as Baependi as Benevente as Beberibe as Bocaina as Bauru - now a museum ship in Rio de Janeiro as Bertioga as Bracui

After the end of World War II, the United States Navy transferred many ships of the Cannon class to other navies.


Watch the video: MwSt Umstellung RSpos Kasse (January 2022).